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LEG STRAPS!!!


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OMG!!!

I have just seen this vid. Its not so much the much commented on take off attempts ( in the very limited time I have ground handled a tandem wing, I know how hard it must be, but what scares the hell out of me is if you look close at the start you will notice that the pilots leg straps are not done up!!!!

I am quite stunned. Imagine being the Passenger when the pilot slips out of the harness!!! :shock:

This is not a dig becasue of who it is. I would have highlighted it anyway!

ALL, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE check and double check your leg straps before take off! Its number one in your PRE FLIGHT's

(for those that dont know, its your leg straps that hold you in to your harness, there is NOTHING you can do if you slip out of the bottom of it! ( and in this case the P2 would have suffered I should think. )

http://vimeo.com/4869122

SW :D

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if ya legs straps aint done up then would the motor not just climb above ya waste and not pull you up?

or would it still lift ya? i cant see this as it pulls you from your legs to lift ya so no straps no flyin? ya wouldnt get to a height and then fall out it would be pretty much at ground level would it not?

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The story I heard sounded just like that; everything was cool until wing started taking load, then motor started getting light and climbing up armpits, notifying pilot there was a woopsy about to happen. Power down, face pinken to prove they're alive and aware of the luck that nothing was damaged. Tell story, embellish, repeat.

That tandem looked underpowered and in light conditions. I've had a free flight tandem pilot tell me that it doesn't matter what you tell your passenger, their feet will do exactly what they want to do despite their head knowing better. "Run, run run" can mean meh, toddle along or sprint for your life. I think this pilot got mixed up with some toddling passenger and still managed to get them airborn.

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You would at the very least be travelling at a reasonable pace at full throttle before you noticed, which could lead to a bad fall with the motor at full energy.

The weightshift bars could grab you by the armpits and pull you into the air, or if the rest of the harness is snug then you could very easily be at a reasonably dangerous height before you realised what was going on.

Even more dangerous if you use a slope to aid your launch as in paragliding. You already have altitude and once launched then you are immediately airborne.

The paragliding harness allows more scope for dealing with this problem. You can grab the risers and then flick your legs backwards over your head and around the risers while you pull the seat under you. Wouldn't want to try this with a motor as this would put your feet near or through the top of the prop! :shock:

Not at all healthy whichever way you look at it!!!

Fly safe,

Ian.

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if ya legs straps aint done up then would the motor not just climb above ya waste and not pull you up?

or would it still lift ya?

All sorts of unwelcome scenario come to mind, you will of course have the brakes in you hands so downwards movement as you slip out of the harness is likely to stall the wing I would think :?:shock:

Alan

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I hate to admit it but Ive done it :oops: I took off without my leg straps fastened... I let go of the brakes,,,held my arms wide open this stopped me falling out .....(weightshift bars),,, bent my arms at the elbows took hold of the risers and pulled myself up into the seat.... :oops:

.I got distracted whilst talking when I was clipping in......I fastened the front mounted reserve and did not notice (because I couldnt see my leg straps) they wernt fastened.......on my new pap system you have to do the leg straps up so you can fasten the rest of it.

lesson learnt........I now tell people to shut up on preflight... :shock: ...have a behind the head reserve..so so lucky

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Again - if you follow a set procedure, or sequence for clipping in, and checking as you go it's the best idea. I always start with the leg straps first... Interestingly enough too, while i'm doing my landing preparations i always check the legs straps.... not that i'd ever touch them when i'm in the air, but i always like to reasssure myself that when i slip out of the harness at 50ft prior to landing, i'm going to stay with the machine.

GD

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If we are holding our hands up to previous cock-ups in the name of enhancing the safety of the group then I also have a bit of a confession to make -

On one of my early flights I was distracted by previous failed launches and took off without doing up the stomach strap (hidden behind the reserve). While climbing out I put the brakes on the magnets to try and get in the seat and then found that I was hanging too low to get in. Even worse, when I tried to take the brakes again I found that I could only just reach them. I decided to continue my climb to get some distance from anything hitable and then have one last almighty effort to get into the seat with both hands or turn back to the field. Luckily this time I was successful and then managed to get the strap done up.

I now refuse to be distracted by anything or anyone before take-off and religiously count all four straps to be firmly closed before bringing the wing up.

Fly safe! :D

Ian.

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Whilst on the subject of trailing things along, whilst taking off, I did see another horrific video of a guy who forgot to check his reserve pins one day. Luckily he got high enough before it opened, so it had enough altitude to do it's work. But if it opened at 20 to 30 feet, he might've swung into the ground like the proverbial conker. So check yer straps, chin strap, laces and yer pins folks.

Dave

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Diligence saves lives and bent metal doesn't it?

I love the calm approach with a recognition that distractions can disrupt your flight preparation. Good habits will save you time but more importantly catch the things you might have missed. Picking up something at the last minute that might have caused you problems later won't always be chance - Training applies the focus you need and develops all of the above.

Sorry if I am peeing you off with 'worldly advise' here but the parallels with other forms of aviation stick out like a dogs doo-daahs. No-one can turn the clock back by even a microsecond ...

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Check were the bain of my ife when I was military aircrew. It took me ages to learn them. But they stuck. So when we had a loss of hydraulic pressure one flight, I was glad I had been made to make the effort. Not like the Czech Loady I once met, smoking a fag in the cabin!!

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As Gordon and Norman have said a full check prior to launch is the key.

I get the funniest looks from other pilots when PPG or free flying because I go through everything in a set routine every time. Even when ground handling.

I do a preflight exactly the same way I do for a fixed wing aircraft. I start at 1 wingtip and work my way around 360 degrees back to the same wing tip checking every line, cell, maillon, nut and bolt, straps etc etc. You get the picture.

Then as I clip in I enter the harness from the same side every time and clip up in the same order everytime. At the end of the flight I unclip in opposite way and leave the PPG/harness in the direction I got in.

Same thing every time.

I used to use this mental checklist for microlights

C ontrols free and correct orientation

H arness and helmet and hatches (check reserve pins!!!!!)

I gnition and instruments

F uel

T rim and temps

A rea wind, aircraft, obstacles and people

R adio

I'm sure there are better ones but I remember that one easily.

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i think with most of us flying from flat fields it wouldnt come to that . is there not ways to deal with not strappin in and being airbourn?

so while in he air yo can strap in safely, i do remember reading something on it somewere?

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i think with most of us flying from flat fields it wouldnt come to that . is there not ways to deal with not strappin in and being airbourn?

so while in he air yo can strap in safely, i do remember reading something on it somewere?

It is possible pg

try hanging your motor up so that the arms are under your arm pits (or the equivalent height) then try getting in the seat??

Pete b

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This is the recovery method for untied leg straps in a PG. It is tricky at the best of times and would be extremely scary in thermic or turbulent conditions and would be impossible to do with a PPG.

I once took off PG (Cage) with loose leg straps (I'd loosened them to walk up the hill) and it was a nightmare getting into the seat so I can just imagine what it would be like hanging from your armpits -shudder-.

Cheers

Mark

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I don't know what the odds are but.....

Today, I helped a high air time pilots at launch and noticed (after his pre flights) that one of his leg straps was undone.

To quote an ARMY saying..... 'Stay Alert! Stay Alive!'

IT HAPPENS!! Maybe more than we think!!

SW :D

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