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Tow Bar Rack


jonnorton
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As I am not allowed to leave the kids at home when on holiday I am looking into different transport options for my paramotor. I had looked at modifying a top box, but think lifting the motor onto the roof would be awkward. I've had a look at previous posts for tow hitch mounted racks / platforms but wondered what different options there were and if anyone had owned / used one and had any feedback? I am also interested in whether the racks are locked on the the car and if you can lock the motor to them. I would not intend to leave it there over night but if I stop at the services for half an hour I would like to think it was safe.

Any advice would be appreciated.

thanks

Jon

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Jon,

I asked the same question 2 weeks ago. I ended up buying a Thule Easybase. I'm really pleased with it. It takes 2 mins to attach to the towbar. You can't lock it to the towbar so I normally use a chain and padlock and connect everything to the chassis. It cost me £120 on eBay.

Hope this helps.

Chris

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I have a tow bar rack but find that the paramotor collects dust on the back of the car and it gets everywhere because its the fine dust that floats up the back of the car. Ive now got a medium round garden table cover that I plan to tie it arround the cage. got it today.

Not used it yet so not sure how good it is but my brother in-law has the same and it seems to work.

Regards

whitters.

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I would worry about the aerodynamics too but my cousin was complaining about the smell of petrol in his car so I can see the draw. Mine lies down, complete, in the Transit van, but it stinks when you sleep next to it. But then, so do I, I'm told ! :shock:

Dave

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I would worry about the aerodynamics too but my cousin was complaining about the smell of petrol in his car so I can see the draw. Mine lies down, complete, in the Transit van, but it stinks when you sleep next to it. But then, so do I, I'm told ! :shock:

Dave

I laughed out loud at that! :D

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Why don't you buy a Renault Kangoo Trekka- theyre's piles of space for a paramotor- you can even get a H&E R120/99 inside with the cage assembled. I need to take the cage off for the R80/115, but this is no big deal. It has better space and fuel economy than most 4x4s... The trekka version also has 4x4 capability- in that it only goes into 4x4mode when the traction slips on the front wheels- very useful in the wet fields here in winter and autumn...

Usually i get all my flying gear in the back, and i still have the 3 seats in the back, and the passenger seat available.

If you're really being pushed- eg... packing for a camping trip, etc.... the entire backseat assembly can be folded down, or completely removed with minimal effort. The rear sliding doors are also real handy.

The fact that you can keep everything inside the vehicle is much safer- out of sight-out of mind... it also keeps everything dry. I've tinted my rear windows as an added security feature.

2008_04010001.JPG

These have to be the most underrated car produced...... absolutely excellent... Unfortunately the Trekka version is no longer produced, but there are plenty on the S/H market still. The standard Kangoo is still fine, but your off road ability will be reduced. Generally the differences in the Trekka are-

-Larger wheels

-Increased ground clearance

-4x4

The 1.9 Diesel will be best suited to deliver maximum torque for off road....

There are some very interesting clips on YouTube of these being put through their paces off road.

GD

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Thanks all,

Unfortunately putting the motor in the car is not an option, I go down to Cornwall quite a lot and the boot is always full with the luggage that is required (accorinding to the wife) for her and the two kids; I will be able to squeeze the wing in.

I will still look at the rack idea, though I hadn't thought about the amount of dirt and dust, as mentioned by Whitters.

Another option is to buy a second motor and wing and leave it down there but I don't think I will get away with that.

I had hoped to go with the roof rack / top box idea by buying the biggest I could find and modifying it so the motor and wing would slot in.

Jon

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I have the Thule rack and love it, but got it cheap from a well known auction site. Usually the motor is simply dropped on the rack complete with cage. However, for those times when you want it out of sight, I have just spotted a 'Garden Storage Box' in 'Netto' budget shop for just under £30. It is 44x20x22 inches and I reckon will take everything bar the cage (and maybe even that with a bit of juggling), including wing, clothes, helmet, motor, spare fuel yadayada.

I'm seriously thinking about it.

Oh, it's also got wheels on one end so you could make it QD and wheel it about.

PK

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  • 11 months later...
I've got one of these: http://www.bak-rak.com/ I think it is stronger than the Thule and cheaper. There are photos of it carrying my motor in my album. I've comfortably loaded it with 3 bikes, a paramotor and 2 suitcases and driven several hundred miles with no problems at all.

Hi SLiM

Thinking of getting a Bak-Rak and I've just been looking at your photos of your kit attached to the Bak-Rak. I was wondering what method you use to secure your paramotor to the rack when travelling.

Thanks

Dan

Edited by Guest
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I have a tow bar rack but find that the paramotor collects dust on the back of the car and it gets everywhere because its the fine dust that floats up the back of the car. Ive now got a medium round garden table cover that I plan to tie it arround the cage. got it today.

Not used it yet so not sure how good it is but my brother in-law has the same and it seems to work.

Hi Whitters

How did you get on with the table cover? Does it work?

Cheers

Dan

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I have a tow bar rack but find that the paramotor collects dust on the back of the car and it gets everywhere because its the fine dust that floats up the back of the car. Ive now got a medium round garden table cover that I plan to tie it arround the cage. got it today.

Not used it yet so not sure how good it is but my brother in-law has the same and it seems to work.

Hi Whitters

How did you get on with the table cover? Does it work?

Cheers

Dan

Hi Dan.

The table cover was a cheap nasty rip stop plastic which fell apart at the seams. I am too tight to buy a decent cover, since having my new Fresh Breeze Ive been putting it inside my Berlingo.

I was considering getting a van but with fuel prices going crazy I am off that idea. Also thought about a nice twin axle trailer like an Ifor Williams http://www.iwt.co.uk/products/box-van which i could also sleep in. But I don't really want to drive it onto the farmers field incase I get stuck (again) or the farmer isn't happy.

Still might go for a trailer for when travelling to fly ins etc.

Whitters.

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I've got one of these: http://www.bak-rak.com/ I think it is stronger than the Thule and cheaper. There are photos of it carrying my motor in my album. I've comfortably loaded it with 3 bikes, a paramotor and 2 suitcases and driven several hundred miles with no problems at all.

Hi SLiM

Thinking of getting a Bak-Rak and I've just been looking at your photos of your kit attached to the Bak-Rak. I was wondering what method you use to secure your paramotor to the rack when travelling.

Thanks

Dan

I use kayak straps like these:

RoofStrap.png

and it works very well but I do get the dirt and rain problem that other people have talked about. I tried covering it in plastic sheet but the wind resistance goes up massively and therefore the stresses on the frame and fixings and also the fuel consumption.

S.

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I got a bakrak but decided against using it for two reasons...

1, Quite frankly it looked ridiculous attached to the back of my Audi a3 (I think Audi skycar were some of the comments :D )

2, The harness on my Parajet is not easy to remove so would have to leave it on along with the reserve and the idea of getting 500 quids worth of reserve wet or covered in road crap really put me off.

I just take it all to bits and put it in the back of the car now, this is also not a great solution but does give me a good chance to inspect the kit.

Tom :acro:

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I'm struggling to decide on a transport method.

I've been entertaining the idea of a small cheap van, but that still won't swallow my 1400 Pap without dismantling. I've looked at a Renault Espace Grand, a Ford Galaxy, Berlingo, Doblo, Kangoo Trekka etc etc, all too small to take the motor whole. Currently looking at Nissan Navara pick-up (Delmobile) and even a Volkswagan Transporter, although I can't really afford it.

I haven't got my Pap yet, so I think I'm going to try the dismantling method to see how long it takes and how much wear and tear it puts on the frame etc. Also how long it takes for the smell of petrol to dissipate (family car).

Anyone got a 3 part frame Pap that can enlighten me?

Based on other posts, I'm rapidly going off the rear carrier option.

Grateful for the comments chaps

Cheers

Dan

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When i put the paramotor in the car, the smell of petrol is always an issue with the wife whether it's actually there or not.

Do what I do with my Audi A4 Estate-

Small square of carpet hooked over the front of the paramotor.

A rachet strap passed around the hinges of the tailgate and though the frame at the top of the harness.

Rachet the paramotor up onto the back of the car and your ready to go in 2mins. When you arrive, release the rachet and its back on the ground ready to fly in 10seconds (much quicker than any other method). :D

Stuart.

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When i put the paramotor in the car, the smell of petrol is always an issue with the wife whether it's actually there or not.

Do what I do with my Audi A4 Estate-

Small square of carpet hooked over the front of the paramotor.

A rachet strap passed around the hinges of the tailgate and though the frame at the top of the harness.

Rachet the paramotor up onto the back of the car and your ready to go in 2mins. When you arrive, release the rachet and its back on the ground ready to fly in 10seconds (much quicker than any other method). :D

Stuart.

Hi Stuart.

Not quite sure what you mean, but I'm interested to understand. Do you have any pictures of your paramotor attached to the car using this method, or if not, any chance you could take a couple next time you go flying?

Just bought a 12 year old Honda CR-V from a client of mine who has had it since virtually new. 150k but full service history. £1500. So, it's either going in the back in pieces, or on the back, whole.

Many thanks

Dan

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I find with my rack, that I only get a bit of dust deposited on it, although it's pretty rare that I take it anywhere if it's actually raining. It's on the back of a Maverick/Terrano, and anyone who owns a similar slab backed vehicle will tell you that muck gets sucked into the space behind them.

Given that the only bit that is likely to suffer from the dust would be the engine, via the air intake, I made up a small nylon bag with a draw string, that goes over the air filter when in transit. Bright orange, so difficult to miss in the pre flight. Keeping the cage all assembled is a big plus for me, as it avoids any issues with some of the extra wires I've got routed for lighting and antenna's. Taking the harness off the Bailey is dead easy, and literally a one minute job, so even in the event of an unexpected downpour, I don't end up with getting a soggy bum next time I fly.

Having said all that, my motor has suffered it's worst 'mucking up' during a slight detour into a certain French ditch during 'that' take off attempt (if you've not seen the video, ask someone else). A hose down sorted the grime aspect, despite the electrics not being rated as waterproof, so I'm not too 'precious' about it, and all worked fine later the same day (once the prop and cage were replaced :oops: )

There is, for me at least, the bonus that the load platform can be used to hold the motor while kitting up and getting into the harness and standing.

I have got a big roll of 'Cordura' type material, and I did make a full cover for my Adventure that turned out pretty well. Maybe the poor old sewing machine will get pressed back into service sometime soon.

I would quite like the functionality of a van that would take the motor in fully assembled form, but I can't justify the expense over a family motor. So for me, the best compromise is the rack (Thule in my case, YMMV). Teamed up with a roof box, the Mav can be all but empty, but still have all my kit on board.

Phil

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The Honda CR-V looks perfect for rear door paramotor mounting.

I should have some pics of my set up for you by Sunday.

Stuart.

When i put the paramotor in the car, the smell of petrol is always an issue with the wife whether it's actually there or not.

Do what I do with my Audi A4 Estate-

Small square of carpet hooked over the front of the paramotor.

A rachet strap passed around the hinges of the tailgate and though the frame at the top of the harness.

Rachet the paramotor up onto the back of the car and your ready to go in 2mins. When you arrive, release the rachet and its back on the ground ready to fly in 10seconds (much quicker than any other method). :D

Stuart.

Hi Stuart.

Not quite sure what you mean, but I'm interested to understand. Do you have any pictures of your paramotor attached to the car using this method, or if not, any chance you could take a couple next time you go flying?

Just bought a 12 year old Honda CR-V from a client of mine who has had it since virtually new. 150k but full service history. £1500. So, it's either going in the back in pieces, or on the back, whole.

Many thanks

Dan

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I would quite like the functionality of a van that would take the motor in fully assembled form, but I can't justify the expense over a family motor. So for me, the best compromise is the rack (Thule in my case, YMMV). Teamed up with a roof box, the Mav can be all but empty, but still have all my kit on board.

Phil

I've been drooling over a VW Caravelle. A friend of mine has one and as you say Phil it swallows the paramotor whole and the seats fold down so he can sleep in it as well. Just need to get mi hands on about £10k to get a half decent one that hasn't been around the world a few times.

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