Jump to content

Chances of Dying


Recommended Posts

Not sure if this has ever been posted. very clever...and didn't see paramotoring!!!! :lol:

http://www.besthealthdegrees.com/health-risks/

Another way of quantifying the chances of death is the `micromort`.

It`s the equivalent of a one-in-a-million chance of death when carrying out an activity.

Saw a programme about it on TV last year.

I suppose skydiving is (vaguely) comparable to PPG and they reckon that doing that carries a micromort rating of 7 per jump.

Riding a motorcycle for 40 miles also has a micromort rating of 7!

So i reckon i`ve done the equivalent of about 5000 skydives on a motorcyle!

Strangely, travelling by canoe is considered just as dangerous as a bike.

Taking up flying seems to be a safe option..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's a bit misleading that site. For hang gliding, is it 1 in 560 flights, participants, or deaths per year?

I always thought skydiving was much more dangerous than either PG or HG? Also it doesn't seem to agree with http://www.footflyer.com/Safety/Inciden ... alysis.htm

Compared to Sky Diving. Not surprisingly, sky diving is incredibly dangerous! It's a skydiver myth that flying up in the airplane is more dangerous than the jump out. According to the U.S. Parachute association (USPA), a sky diver is 4 times more likely to die on the jump out than the flight up. That means that sky diving is about 4 times more dangerous than powered paragliding. 4 paramotor flights is the same death risk as one skydive. That is, in fact, how I decided to go skydiving—I decided the fun factor would equate to 4 paramotor flights. Risk and reward.

Like the old saying goes, there's lies, damn lies, then statistics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chances of dying are 100% for each of us.

I'd like to reduce my chances of dying without having done a bunch of stuff. Given that death is certain, the only way to redress the balance is to do as much stuff as I can.

"Zoom! What was that?

That was your life, Mate!

That was quick, do I get another?

Sorry, Mate."

- John Cleese.

Perhaps we should look at the statistics for living (as opposed to simply existing)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chances of dying are 100% for each of us.

I'd like to reduce my chances of dying without having done a bunch of stuff. Given that death is certain, the only way to redress the balance is to do as much stuff as I can.

"Zoom! What was that?

That was your life, Mate!

That was quick, do I get another?

Sorry, Mate."

- John Cleese.

Perhaps we should look at the statistics for living (as opposed to simply existing)?

Last comment, bang on the nail!

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a very soft spot for something Helen Keller said many years ago:

"Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing."

This one is going on my facebook. :-)

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And deaf.

Helen Keller

Born Helen Adams Keller

June 27, 1880

Tuscumbia, Alabama, USA

Died June 1, 1968 (aged 87)

Arcan Ridge, Easton, Connecticut, USA

Signature

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Ride a motor cycle in Brazil! I'll stick to the flying thanks....

Brazil's Map of Violence 2012, Traffic Accidents, a document from Instituto Sangari, found that there has been an unpleasant consequence of the explosion in the sale of motorcycles in Brazil.

In 1970, there were a little more than 62,000 of them, a mere 2.4% of the total vehicle fleet. By the year 2000, there were 4 million motorcycles and as a percentage of the total vehicle fleet on Brazilian roads and highways they had risen to 13.6%.

Preliminary figures for 2010, put the number of motorcycles in the country at 16.5 million, meaning that one in every four vehicles nowadays is a motorcycle (25.5% of the fleet).

During the last decade, while the number of motorcycles in circulation rose over 400%, the number of automobiles also rose, doubling (up 118%).

But here is the cruel twist to this story: as the number of motorcycles and automobiles both rose between 2000 and 2010, the number of deaths in automobile accidents rose only 58%, but deaths in accidents involving motorcycles leaped more than 800%.

As the numbers rose, there was a perverse "category" shift in traffic accidents. As a rule, it is the vulnerable pedestrian who leads the statistics, followed by automobiles. Thus, in 1996, over 24,000 pedestrians died in traffic accidents and 7.188 people in automobiles. In third place, motorcyclists: 1,421.

Ten years later (in 2007, when 12,362 pedestrians died in traffic accidents), a significant turnaround: more motorcyclists died, 10,392, than people in automobiles, 10,218.

Note that between 1996 and 2007, pedestrian deaths fell by 50% and automobile deaths rose less than 50%. During the same period deaths on motorcycles were up almost tenfold.

In 2009, the great (but sad) turnaround: more motorcyclists died than pedestrians in traffic accidents in Brazil (11,839 to 11,194, with automobile deaths in third place: 10,347)

Julio Jacobo Waiselfisz, a sociologist who wrote the Sangari report on highway violence, says the tendency is for the number of motorcyclists dying in traffic accidents to rise even more as the number of them on the road will continue to increase. He points to easy credit for installment buying, people with more money and the transportation necessities of modern life.

"Motorbikes have become a necessity for many and in general they solve the problem," says the sociologist. But, he adds, before they became easy to acquire, they were a middle class consumer's dream. "You know, there was this thing about being free and feeling the wind in your face."

According to Jacobo, traffic regulations and enforcement pay a lot more attention to vehicles with four wheels than two. "Many speed traps in Brazil (radar) cannot capture clear images of motorbike license plates. They need a different type of equipment."

Jacobo has some chilling numbers to describe the situation. He points out that during the last decade, while the number of automobiles on Brazilian roads doubled, the chances of dying in a car accident was actually falling.

That is the opposite of what is happening with motorcycles. Statistically, says Jacobo, a motorbike rider's chances of dying in a road accident nowadays is 14 times that of someone in a car.

Every week the emergency room at the Hospital das Clínicas in the University of São Paulo School of Medicine receives an average of eleven victims of motorcycle accidents.

A worrisome statistic is that 35% of people riding motorbikes who die in traffic accidents are found to have been involved in substance abuse or were drinking in excess.

Dr Julia Greve, an orthopedist at the hospital, points out that while there has been a general reduction in traffic accidents in São Paulo, down 35% between 2008 and 2012, the number of accidents with motorbikes rose 14% during the same period.

The victims of motorbike accidents now occupy around 60% of the beds in the hospital and Dr Greve says the institution is near the point of saturation. She goes on to say that the situation in São Paulo is critical because of cultural and behavioral factors that have made the city into a transportation beehive: with 11 million inhabitants, there are over 7 million vehicles.

According to Dr Greve, the only solution is to change behavior, invest heavily in public transportation and create restrictions on the individual use of cars and motorbikes. She also insists on more rigorous punishment of drunken driving.

The traffic problem in São Paulo is so serious that the city held an international seminar on the subject last month with the participation of renowned experts from around the world: Gjerde Hallvard, from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Eugênia Maria Rodrigues, from the Pan-American Health Organization (Opas) and Chip Walls, from the Criminal Toxicology Laboratory at the University of Miami.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...