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Exactly how does a wing work then?


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Apparently the wing pushes air down more on the underside than the top side, forcing it up. I'm not sure how different this is to the air goes faster over the top than bottom causing a pressure difference theory. 

 

Either way I guess the wing works and that's all I need to know ;)

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In it's simplest form....

 

Upper edge of aerofoil is longer that the bottom

Path that the air takes over the top of the wing is longer than the bottom of the wing

Time for the air to travel from the front to the back of the wing is the same- therefore the air taking the top route has to go faster than the air taking the bottom route.

As the air on the top route is 'stretched', it's density or pressure is lower than the air on the underside of the wing

Air wants to move from areas of high pressure to low pressure- therefore the underside of the wing exerts a 'lifting' force on the wing.

 

 

 

 


 

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In a similar vein: How an internal combustion engine works:

Air is invited into the carburetor, with the promise of free drinks. Air mixes with the drink (fuel) and becomes confused.

Confused air is ushered into the cylinder, before it really knows what's happening. Once inside, the doors are closed. Then the wall (piston) starts closing in (as experienced by humans with cider).

A lot of confused air is packed into a small space and it only needs a small spark to initiate panic. Air goes absolutely mad and starts kicking out in all directions, pushing the wall (piston) back until finally the doors are opened and the air charges out with a lot of noise.

I have another explanation involving entropy, but it goes on a bit and involves cats and buttered toast.

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23 minutes ago, ptwizz said:

In a similar vein: How an internal combustion engine works:

Air is invited into the carburetor, with the promise of free drinks. Air mixes with the drink (fuel) and becomes confused.

Confused air is ushered into the cylinder, before it really knows what's happening. Once inside, the doors are closed. Then the wall (piston) starts closing in (as experienced by humans with cider).

A lot of confused air is packed into a small space and it only needs a small spark to initiate panic. Air goes absolutely mad and starts kicking out in all directions, pushing the wall (piston) back until finally the doors are opened and the air charges out with a lot of noise.

I have another explanation involving entropy, but it goes on a bit and involves cats and buttered toast.

Love it Pete....please share the cats and buttered toast. If nobody else appreciates it....that's their problem, I know I will.

Cheers.

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Trying to keep this reasonably succinct...

As we are all aware, a cat will always land on its feet and buttered toast will always land butter side down on the workshop floor, carpet or cat.

So, if one were to attach a slice of well buttered toast, butter side up, to the back of a cat (using a suitably comfortable harness), the universe does not know whether to allow the cat to land on its feet or the toast to land butter side down. Hence, the cat/toast combo hovers a few inches above the ground. I have a photo to support this, but I still can't post images!

Using the same principle, we are also aware that a small, expensive engine component, if dropped, will find its way into the tray of used oil, sludge, fag ends etc. This happens even if the tray is on the other side of the workshop, showing that the universe is prepared to reverse entropy just to be awkward. We also know that everything happens more when it is hotter. On a summer morning, just as one is assembling ones paramotor, one drops a small but vital part. As one struggles to find it, the sun warms the day and the part becomes harder to find, until one is a sweating, grounded and agitated wreck.

So, we construct an engine with a bath of used oil and sludge at the bottom (sump) and an expensive part at the top (piston). The expensive piston is drawn towards the sump, but this won't turn the motor. Heating the arrangement increases its entropy and allows the universe more energy with which to draw the expensive piston into the oily sump.

An arrangement which can burn a convenient liquid fuel to produce cycles of heat and cold causes the force drawing the piston to the sump to rise and fall, turning the engine.

Viola!

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18 minutes ago, Mike Thomas said:

If you dont have the `belief` .... try hanging two sheets of paper, about an inch (25mm for you non imperialists) apart  between two fingers and thumbs , then blow between them .

logic says they should be blown outwards from each other by the rushing air , in fact the opposite happens .

Mine caught fire - did i do something wrong?

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7 hours ago, gordon_dunn said:

In it's simplest form....

 

Upper edge of aerofoil is longer that the bottom

Path that the air takes over the top of the wing is longer than the bottom of the wing

Time for the air to travel from the front to the back of the wing is the same- therefore the air taking the top route has to go faster than the air taking the bottom route.

As the air on the top route is 'stretched', it's density or pressure is lower than the air on the underside of the wing

Air wants to move from areas of high pressure to low pressure- therefore the underside of the wing exerts a 'lifting' force on the wing.

How do `planes fly upside down, then?:D

Edited by Hann__
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Re: planes flying upside down.

 

Refer back to the original diagram. Flying upside down causes the pilot to question the wisdom of such an endeavour. This translates into increased doubt resulting in turn into increased inverted lift.

 

What I want to know is how 30 odd sq m of slightly crispy fabric can overcome gravity and get me in the air !

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8 hours ago, Hodders said:

What I want to know is how 30 odd sq m of slightly crispy fabric can overcome gravity and get me in the air !

If you think about it you're Not overcoming gravity as without engine or thermals you would not get off the ground, without either we fall back to planet gracefully but when their added we enjoy something called Flight, here endeth my education lesson today :D.

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