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Concept Paramotor.


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You need Eye drops mate. ;-)

It's round for a start! lol

SW :D

I was thinking of the Walkerjet Simon. It's even the same colour. But now you mention it, they must've had a bit of a blond moment when they decided to put flat bits in the frame of 'ol Flattie eh? Silly sods. They must be possessed. LOL :lol:

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I bet a lot of our current motors would look pretty sleek if you took off the fuel tank and all the ancillaries.

Has anyone else seen pictures of the Nirvana 'Instinct'? That (to my eye) looks pretty good too, although not a machine for a beginner like me, as the cage doesn't look too substantial.

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Hi Dave,

Assuming that person is not me.. I would like to talk to that person please.

I have a project with Carbon but have just never got the time to make decent moulds.

Please send me his details so I can call him.

Cheers dude!

SW :D

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Talking of carbon fibre has anyone though of having their cage made out of it? could free up some wieght, I know someone who can reproduce anything you give him out of carbon fibre.

Dave.

Beyonce Knowles?

already got one on back order along with a angelina jolie and of course a christina agulaera because shes "Diirrtttyyy" :D

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Hi Dave,

Assuming that person is not me.. I would like to talk to that person please.

I have a project with Carbon but have just never got the time to make decent moulds.

Please send me his details so I can call him.

Cheers dude!

SW :D

I will get his current phone number from my friend tommorow as I only have his old one, will either PM it to you or bring it friday.

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That cage and chassis looks nice, but it looks way too strong to act like a crumple zone in the event of a bad landing. All the energy will be transmitted straight through to the pilot. The balance between getting a cage strong enough to take minor knocks but capable of absorbing energy in a crash is a difficult one. I don't think there is any on the market close to being an ideal balance.

Personally, I'll stick to light weight steel tube frames of the PAP and H&E type till something better comes in. They crumple very well, they are large in size, and they are very light. Unfortunately, they don't take minor knocks very well and they are more cumbersome than compact models. I've seen and heard from people who have crashed badly on these types of cages and walked away unscathed or with very minor injuries with the cage and chassis being a complete write off. I also know of more people with this type of frame needing minor repairs (pulling out bends) to the frame than more substantial ones.

Building a cage out of carbon fibre will not save much weight compared to light weight steel or metal frames. It is possible to lift a PAP style frame with nothing on it with a just couple of fingers. The few grams saved will probably be less significant than weight gains from something like a carbon fibre exhaust. Carbon fibre will not crumple and progressively absorb energy like metal. The springiness will allow energy to be transmitted to the pilot or it will shatter after absorbing a fixed amount of energy. IMO if you were building a CF framed paramotor, to allow for maximal passive safety at least the lower third of the cage will have be made of deformable metal. You then end up with the problem of mating two dissimilar materials in machine prone to severe vibration. Also, things like weightshift arms and backplates would still have to be made of metal or have some metal within the CF, as they are either highly stressed or prone to cracking from vibration. Ultimately, it is a case of too much pain for very little gain not to mention costs.

CF frames are not a new. Kobra had a prototype last year. http://www.kobrappg.com/web/index.php?o ... view&id=23

It looks really neat in those pictures, but I wouldn't want to have a hard landing in one of them for both health and financial reasons.

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That is a fair point.

Although I would have used a hybrid Carbon Kevlar fabric (Kevlar is used in motorsport with Carbon to absorb scrapes and bumps.)

Tha mian reason I would do it would be 'just to do it', I just fancy it. :D

We developed a way to make carbon / Kevlar tube structures very quickly when I owned a carbon company (used on the TVR 24 hour teams car for two seasons). I actually think that once the first one is done, I could make a cheeper carbon kevlar frame than any of the suppliers will sell me a new metal one for.

But as I say, main reason is just becasuse I can and it will be fun. :D

SW :D

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Very refreshing to see that the importance of the motor acting as protection for the pilot is starting to shine through the mist. I appreciate that people might get fed up with hearing the same old stuff, but it can be equally disspleasing to hear about people in hospital with pelvic injuries. Save one more chap from that and it'll be worth it.

Should just add a little about how the crumple zone absorbs some of the impact. The seat you are sat in needs to remain a seat, even when your wing has completely collapsed, and you are free falling. If your wing is no longer suspending your weight shift arms, the arms are no longer suspending the base of your seat and so your butt will hit the deck (if you're that way up when you hit) To get a seat to remain something your butt can sit on and put pressure on, and therefor capable of utilising the crushability of the undercage, when the wing no longer supports it, you need fixed hangpoints. As used on the Walkerjet and ofcourse the Flat Top.

The fixed points are on the comfort bars (the bits that point forward and look like the arms of an armchair) also handy for keeping the weight of the engine off you if you fall forward.

Hopefully these features wont be needed, but as they say with motor bikes, "ride to stay on / dress to fall off"

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Hi there, just reading all the posts.

I have a small company manufacturing carbon fibre parts, mainly for the marine trade with a workshop in Burnham on Crouch in Essex.

If anyone has any ideas for carbon fibre parts i would be happy to Look in to making them in a "toys and hobbies" type way. As Simon has said "because i can" and it would also help me as a newbie to get a better understanding of the kit and setup.

just an idea.

Boycey

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I am not fully convinced by the high hang point argument. I haven't flown any motors with high hang points but seeing friends I've flown with struggle more than me despite having much better ground handling skills, I am not very keen on trying one. I guess everything is a trade off. What you gain in feedback about flying conditions with low hang points, you lose in pitch stability and vice versa. I am not sure about being dumped out of the seat in the event of a collapse. Paraglider pilots don't seem to slide out of their harnesses mid air with collapses. You would probably slide out on impact. If the cage is large enough, lifting the legs up on impact would ensure that the initial energy of impact goes through the cage and not through the pilot. It's not perfect, but is a reasonable tradeoff as far as I am concerned.

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