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Solo 210 wont stop!


fuel9m
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Hi

My PAP with Solo 210 runs so sweet that today it wouldnt stop when I pressed the kill switch. Can anyone give me a quick pointer as to what the fault might be before I start taking it apart to investigate?

I'm guessing its something very simple to do with electric cicuit. I had to stop it by covering the air intake with my hand.

Thanks for any tips/headstarts!

Joe

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killswitch should be your first port of call, check that is operating correctly, you can trace the wires down to the motor, theres 2 connectors on top of the motor, you can pull those apart, pass a current into one and then connect the other connecter to a multimeter press the killswitch and see if you are getting a current through the circuit.

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First thing to check is the wiring to the switch. Disassemble the hand unit, or unscrew out the switch and run a multi meter between the switch connections and the other ends of the wire. If there is no exposed parts to run the multimeter off, then stick a small pin through the wire insulation to make contact with the conducting core. If the wires are OK, then check the switch itself..... Should be a 'push to make' switch on the Adventure units i think. Replace as necessary. If it's not these, then it's a bigger issue- but 90% of the time the connection to the throttle handle is responsible.

GD

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The kill switch will take either the contact breaker feed that goes to the coil, or the magneto ignition coil output, down to earth when you press it. just check continuity in the switch with the leads to it disconnected. It should make contact when you press it.

Make sure you check the above with any master switch turned 'ON', because master switches often ground the same circuit in the 'OFF' position as a safety feature.

If the switch is ok, the odds are that it's the connection at the earth end.

Edited by Guest
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You say "so sweet" meaning it worked really well in flight? EGT #?

Be careful this isn't detonation keeping it running.

Coked pistons can offer enough heat retention to 'diesel' on long after ignition has been cut.

Smothering or flooding are then the only options.

I hope it is just electrical as the alternate would need more effort and possibly parts.

If electrical looks ok, roll piston to the bottom and have a look in the plug hole with a mirror if necessary.

Low hours? High oil percentage?

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You say "so sweet" meaning it worked really well in flight? EGT #?

Be careful this isn't detonation keeping it running.

Coked pistons can offer enough heat retention to 'diesel' on long after ignition has been cut.

Smothering or flooding are then the only options.

Just to add to the above, running on isn't really dieseling. Running on is, as you say, caused by carbon still glowing and igniting your fuel mix . Dieseling on the other hand is caused by too high a compression ratio for your fuel octane, and the compression alone creates enough heat to cause ignition. The first of these is only a problem with regards to getting the engine to stop, the latter on the other hand will give your big end and main bearings a really hard time, likely causing premature failure. Dieseling will manifest itself on a perfectly clean engine, without any carbon build up.

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I knew single quotes wouldn't be sufficient on that post to avoid clarification/correction.

It was a risk. Using a day to day analogy folks were familiar with, but Phil is correct.

I oversimplified to the point of misleading.

A coked piston can either cause run on or in some cases detonation, which is worse then dieseling for bearings, rings, or pistons.

To be clear, smothering and flooding are the same thing too, they both snuff a flame, just from alternate ends of the combustion mixture spectrum.

ie. remove oxygen or add too much fuel - same result.

Like I said, I hope it's just electrical.

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The Solo 210 is well known to run on when hot.

It has been widely suggested that the cause is excessive carbon build-up, but we found it occurring even on fairly new engines and thus decided it was more likely to be the plug heat range slightly too hot for that particular day/temp/pressure.

Back in the dark ages! when we used the engine we would recommend that customers open the throttle while pressing the stop button, that usually works.

PB

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I had the same problem with a PAP with Corsair M21Y.

The problem was with the switch wires which are routed on the frame behind the harness.

These wires have bullet type connections to allow the throttle assy., to be removed.

One of he connections had pulled apart due to not enough slack.

Slight modification of the routing and several cable ties resolved the issue.

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