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CP (power) to CP (hill)


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I am booked on a full CP (power) course with Fly Spain in April this year and cannot wait!

One question i am struggling to find an answer to is how does it work if I get my CP power license and then want to also fly without a motor? Do i have to do another full CP (hill) course or is there a club route and extra exam i can do?

I have looked at a few of wings and the Gin Gliders Bolero 4 looks nice and appears to be designed so i could use it with and without a motor (is that right?). If i enjoy the sport as much as i hope i will I dont want to just be limited to using a motor especially as my Parents live in the lakes :)

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks

Paul

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Hi Paul and welcome to the Paramotor Club. :-)

I am not sure if there is an actual 'conversion' course that the BHPA offer but someone will give you the heads up soon enough :-)

I was taught by the BHPA on a winch, only to find that I was not allowed to fly at the hill as no conversion course existed at the time. (went on for about a year) so well worth asking the question.

Again, Welcome

SW :D

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Hi Paul and welcome to the Paramotor Club. :-)

I was taught by the BHPA on a winch, only to find that I was not allowed to fly at the hill as no conversion course existed at the time. (went on for about a year) so well worth asking the question.

Thanks Simon, how did you start flying from a hill then? Did you have to do the CP (hill) course? I guess your EP is valid for any environment?

I can see the sense in making the distinction between Power and hill but i would hope there is a easy conversion between them given the large amount of crossover.

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There is 100% a need to have different training when flying from a hill :-)

I did not have to do the entire CP hill, Francis Rich put a winch to hill conversion course together for the BHPA which I think still exists today. So Myself and a load of mates from (then) up North come down to do the conversion training.

Then I too was allowed to wait on the hill with the 50 other people waiting for the 1 in 100 days that is was flyable.....

Then I got a Paramotor :-) :-)

SW :D

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I imagine most people go from Hill to Paramotor not the other way around so i would probably have to do the full CP hill. I might give the BHPA a bell and bell and see what they say.

I know what you mean about having the perfect conditions, I got part way though my EP paragliding about 10 years ago in the Lakes, it was a 140 mile round trip which normally resulted in frustration of not being able to fly.

I gave up after a couple of months and forgot about it.

A couple of years ago i tried to learn to skydive. After 14 jumps i decided the only part of the sport i liked was the canopy handling (i knocked myself out on my 13th jump after a bad exit!). About the same time i saw a paramotor go over my house and started researching it.

This year after lots of dreaming i decided to get it booked. The next challenge is to afford to buy my kit.

I am planning to buy my wing new (because i want nice stable forgiving one) and the motor second hand then upgrade if i really love it, does that make sense?

Thanks,

Paul

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Paul,

I went from 'Hill' to 'Power' and it did have some advantages. Anyone on this site will tell you that ground handling your wing is the most difficult part of being a pilot - I found 'power conversion' easier as I could already handle a wing, even in fairly rough conditions from my 'hill' flying experience.

As has already been said, the BHPA don't run a specific course for 'Power' to 'hill', but my power conversion only took 3 days and was nowhere near as expensive as I thought it would be. If you really want to fly in both categories (and I would thoroughly recommend that you do as the buzz from both is astounding), then it might be worth doing your CP (Hill) qualification first. Some die hard Paraglider pilots will tell you that it takes far more skill to fly from a hill than it does to use power but I think each discipline has it's own series of required skills and are each very different.

As for the 'one wing fits all' category, I have to say from my own experience that there aren't many beginner wings out there that do both jobs well. Once you get more advanced there a few wings that will free fly and motor well but you don't wanna be flying those in the early days as they'll likely scare the crap out of you and put you off.

Lastly, why are you going to Spain when there are so many great schools in the UK to choose from? Wouldn't be our amazing weather by any chance? Lol

Welcome mate!

Pianoman

Sent from my iPad using PMC Forum mobile app.

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Hi Simon,

Thats for the advice. One thing i love about sports such as this is how really experienced pilots such as yourself are happy to give so much free time and advice to other people. I found the world of skydiving a bit elitist. If you were not CAT 8 people tended to ignore you :(

I booked in Spain because the nearest Paramotor school to me is 70 miles away, i run my own business and don't have the time or money to spend my weekends watching the wind blow in the wrong direction :) If the school was closer say 20-30 miles then i would have stayed in the UK.

Also its an excuse to get some sun for a couple of weeks.

I had a look at your company site, much respect to the work you do! I do some filming from a quadcopter in my spare time (only for fun not money) and was fascinated by the work you do!

My business does line of sight surveys for wireless networks and I thought i could use one at work for surveying until I looked at the CAA rules for commercial work at which point i gave up and kept it as a hobby.

Thanks again.

Paul

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Most people tend to do their training spread over a few weekends here and there - mainly because of the weather, but also due to the fact than unless you're an 'iron man' contender, the course (especially in the first few days) is physically exhausting. Running about a field with a 30kg pack on your back and a wing overhead will certainly get the blood pumping so if your gonna do the entire course in one hit, best be making sure you're cardio vascular fitness and stamina is up to parr - mine certainly wasn't! Lol

Pianoman

Sent from my iPad using PMC Forum mobile app.

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Running about a field with a 30kg pack on your back and a wing overhead will certainly get the blood pumping so if your gonna do the entire course in one hit, best be making sure you're cardio vascular fitness and stamina is up to parr - mine certainly wasn't! Lol.

I better start getting to the gym more!

I found with sky diving that the gaps in between weekends jumping reset my learning curve and i learnt far more when i had consecutive days training.

That said 11 days training in a row may be too much :?

I am lead to believe the first week is mainly without the motor doing the EP part.

Did you manage to complete your course?

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Yeah, the first few days are ground handling and 'wing management' with a few short hops to get you used to the controls - it's fun, but exhausting. Once you get over that bit and get competent at flying, it becomes less physically draining but I must be honest and say that I would of seriously struggled to train day after day after day....but I am unfit! Lol

Passed with flying colours eventually and never looked back mate! You'll love it!

Pianoman

Sent from my iPad using PMC Forum mobile app.

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Paul, you say..

I am planning to buy my wing new (because i want nice stable forgiving one) and the motor second hand then upgrade if i really love it, does that make sense?

IMHO it would be better if you did it the other way around and bought a new motor and a second hand wing. If you buy a good motor there is no reason that it should'nt do you for several years. On the other hand, if you get a nice calm wing to start on, which is a good idea, then you will probably grow out of it in a year or so.

Just my opinion, good luck,

Christian

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi

We always recommend to our students to spend the money on a new wing and save on the motor in the secondhand market. Theory being motor stops not a biggie your still flying and you go land ( as being a good pilot you would have been keeping an emergency landing options open at all times).

On the other hand wing stops working things ar'nt just as rosie :explode:

Trouble with second hand wings is unless you personally know the guy selling you have no idea to its history. For all you know its someone who bought it new went on an SIV course landed in the sea 4-5 times over the week ( cos you do) rinsed it out and sells it quite truthfully as a low hour six month old glider But give it another 6 months and all those salt crystals will done their damage and its a worn out throw away hanky.

thats my tuppence worth.

Cheers Col....

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I agree with weesplat, I went new wing and saved a bit on the motor for the same reasons. There are a lot of wings out there that offer the safety but also last well into your flying life. Just be careful because you can hit the the same problems with second motors low hours bent and straightened a few times. Just waiting for you to sit down before is knackered.!

Cheers Lee.

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Hi

We always recommend to our students to spend the money on a new wing and save on the motor in the secondhand market. Theory being motor stops not a biggie your still flying and you go land ( as being a good pilot you would have been keeping an emergency landing options open at all times).

On the other hand wing stops working things ar'nt just as rosie :explode:

This was my thought process, motor dies you are still flying and assuming you have the height and awareness landing should not be a problem.

Personally my motivation for learning to fly is the experience of being at height i dont have any interest in acrobatics i would prefer a slower more forgiving wing for a relaxing flight.

I had a similar discussion when i started motorbiking but my 600cc bike still excites me, i have never felt the need to get a fireblade or similar.

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