Jump to content

One of us flew in Devon tonight


Recommended Posts

Unfortunately, my friend's wing was lying off to one side and he fell over and broke his 4 th prop. They're £230 a go. It take's him over a month to save that kind of money. I almost cried for him. Sad thing is, 4 props add up to nearly a grand, which added to the purchase price of his unit, comes to more than what I fly. So he's talking about selling it now and having a share in a stronger unit.

The wind was switching tonight and I messed up too. Left some marks in the ground and looked silly but pushed the button again and enjoyed a 1 1/2 hour flight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Dave,

I finally flew my fusion for the first time in 3 weeks today myself and Mark who flies an apco thrust took off from Leven airfield and did a cross country flight of 33 miles over flying were i live.

I must say it felt great to be back in the air again after some awful weather and as a big bonus i have just swapped my harness on my parajet and the new one with a slightly different set up flew perfectly in a straight line on full reflex and no hands.

It also weight shifted a lot better so all in all a great day cheers Alan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very pleased to hear you had a nice cross country on the Fusion tonight Alan. I flew one a month ago and liked it alot. Glad you're pleased with your new harness set up too. Changing mine for a quick release system soon. It wont make weightshift any better, unfortuneately, but I'll still have a seat under me if things all go Pete Tong. I flew my cruise across country with mostly weightshift input tonight. Mid level fixed hangpoints aren't the most responsive to weightshift but with a little practice one can "wintip drag left then right". I think there's footage of some guy doing it on youtube somewhere.

At 100 hours experience, I humbled myself and took some training, last weekend. You can never get too much IMO. No doubt my friend would benefit from some more too, but having a coach in the field might not have stopped him from breaking his prop tonight. Using a different machine most probably would've. I never put any pressure on him to use one like mine. He's just seen me enjoy loads of hours at less expense than he's had. And I've been matching his speed on my slightly overloaded Atis. (Not that I'm against reflex technology. I'm thinking of buying one)

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Something else I thought of in my sleep. I'm sure some of the cheap props are good, but what a pity to have to use less than the best performing and quietest, for fear of breaking one. The strong cage with bags of clearance is still my preferred option. And my friend's above average on groundwork. 4 falls is not bad with the number of flights he's made. Probably a 100. One of those was when a badly designed throttle slipped around in his hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave I think its fair to say that if a good take off technique (that does not require a strong frame) can not be 'sussed' more training is required.

A strong frame should be irrelivant.

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I must agree entirely Simon. The cage should not make contact with the ground, and should NEVER make contact with the prop. Good piloting will keep it off but just occasionally it seems to go wrong, for whatever reason. People can and do break props well after their training days. Find me the man who can train a guy never to fall over and I'll pay him for a refresher. It would be money well spent.

I dont want to appear too commercial so have sent you a pm Si

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ALMOST entirely agree. As we're thrashing it out, I dont think a strong cage would be irrelevant . A gust of wind on a strong forward launch might be another source of dissappointment. I heard some say thay power through launch is not recommended for some weaker frames. Could be a limitation that some pilots dont want. Dont use it much myself though, unless it's a very light switchy breeze like lastnight.

I'm really trying hard here, to find some advantages of using a weaker frame, just to be fair. I'm all ears.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave its not so much a weeker frame,

I fly a Parajet and have never had problems, I also flew a RAD for many hours (and through my learning phase) with no problems.

there is enough

and there is more than enough.

I recon, most motors are 'enough' and some (including the one I fly) are more than enough.

This is of course an advantage but nothing at all wrong with frames that are 'enough' (90% of the motors out there)

Not dissing the Flatty, it is very strong by the looks of it that IS great, but not 'required'??

this is not a review of course, I am trying to say..... LOADS of other motors out there work well every day with 'enough' frames.

SW :D

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All good points and diplomatically put Simon. I'd expect nothing less of course and respect for that. But I've not been the best of pilots, perhaps, and have been glad of the extra bit of strength on occasions. I've watched plenty of other's props get wiped out too, right here. Most farmers dont like to part with money unneccessarily, so perhaps my background and upbringing come into play here. Since that, my self employed status and that of an employer, might have some bearing on my train of thought. Insurance is good. It will pick up on any chinks in the armour though. Farm machinery is my usual forte, and to have "just enough" guards in place might get you by, with the right guy in charge. The situation changes, however, if you haven't crossed the "T's" and dotted the "I's" when things go wrong.

I find myself agreeing with your comments. Most of the time, for example, will cover a multitude of ills. Attention to detail might take care of a big chunk of the remainder. That's the bit that needs working on. By it's very nature ppg flight is mostly safe due to low speeds flown and inherent pendular stability. It's the bit whilst on the ground, leaving the ground and returning to the ground, where our decisions and equipment choice come into play, most of all.

In reality, you know that my motive for higlighting this point is not financial. I might sell 2 or 3 units in a year. Pocket money. Margins are tight. If anything drives me it's safety. Most of all, consumer choice will do the steering. So when choosing, consumers should know what they're choosing, and why. It's definately not my intention to paint a picture of gloom and danger, but rather to point to a way of affordable joy.

Horses for courses. Most of all, fly it, enjoy it , dont break it and mind yer bones !

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This post is quite an interesting debate to me as i recently broke my propellers and i have a parajet. The reason for my breakage was down to me fitting a kicking strap and on take off i got one foot over the top of the rope causing me to hop i desperately tried to kill the engine but fell over and dinged the tips of my propeller.

I have since removed the strap which i used to get into my harness but after watching that dell chap demonstrate his flat top i have to say i would not have been £300 out of pocket(score Dave). However do i rate my Parajet yes(score Simon) but there is an area those helpful chaps at parajet can explore a wider gap between propeller and cage, after all if dell can do it i am sure Giles can.

Incidentally i did think of trying an aluminium spacer on my machine any thoughts as this may possibly save a propeller in case of a stumble cheers Alan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Incidentally i did think of trying an aluminium spacer on my machine any thoughts as this may possibly save a propeller in case of a stumble cheers Alan.

Hi Alan.

Have a chat with Gilo at Parajet. Whilst at the factory I saw a spacer he had made which has rubber inserts similar to the cush drive inserts on a motorbike sprocket, quietening the prop and reducing any induced vibration from it. This will push your prop back (and away from the cage) by about an inch and if supplied by Parajet would presumably not invalidate any warranty or insurance?

Best regards,

Ian.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do speak with Giles before modifying anything Alan. The closer the prop to the bearings, the LESS strain on them. Also, moving the prop back, unless you have a frame much bigger than the prop, would bring the lines closer to the prop on forward lauch.

edited version

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rubber mounts are okyed by Parjet, DO get them from Parajet though (as you also need the plastic bit) and it will ensure that you have the correct ones and keep your 12 months warranty

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...