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Guest leoibb
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hello all i took plug out because it has not been startin like it should, i found my plug to be very oiled up as in black oil.

now is this the oil ratio too much? or is it too rich? or other? i currently mix at fifty to one.

simonini engine , any advise would be good

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now is this the oil ratio too much? or is it too rich? or other? i currently mix at fifty to one.

simonini engine , any advise would be good

Don't use less oil than 50:1

On the Simonini web site they are recommending 3% (about 32:1) for the mini 2 and mini 4, that is something you need to check and make sure you get it exactly right. Someone told me the Simonini advise not to use Castrol TTS but rather use a semi-synthetic oil, maybe someone that has a manual can confirm this, or not?

Most likely you need to tune the carb, it probably needs to be a bit leaner, but I would put a new plug in first, be very careful when adjusting the carb leaner. Too lean and it will overheat.

Paul D

On the Simonini web site they are recommending 3% (about 32:1) for the mini 2 and mini 4, that is something you need to check and make sure you get it exactly right.

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cheers for that paul a mate of mine has the same engine and he uses 33_1 so i aint over doin it on the oil then? maybe tune the carb on the walbro carb there is a screw and hen a t screw i assume the t screw is for the high revs which wants leaning off a little? tun it in a quarter turn?

they so fiddly

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33-1 mix

Do not use Castroll TTs

Start the engine and warm up

On tick over adjust the ordinary screw (low jet) out (anti clockwise) until the motor starts to four stroke (like missing) make a mental note of where the slot in the screw is.

Now turn the screw in (clockwise) until the revs start to drop, now set the screw in the centre of the two settings.

Get a REALY FIRM GRIP on your cage (get some one else to help you if you can)

Build the revs up until you are flat out and then adjust the T screw as you did with the low jet.

Check that it revs freely from tick over up to full revs , if not open (anti clockwise) the low jet slightly until it does.

After you have done this run the motor flat out for about 1-2 mins and hit the kill switch (without letting the throttle off).

Take the plug out and look at the colour, very light grey, you need to open the T screw a little.

Dark brown, close the T screw a little.

You are looking for a mid brown colour

If you run it too lean it may seize so be careful or get some one who has done it before to do it.

This is only advise and I except no responsibility for any damage you may do to your engine.

Pete b

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i see i will do that then i know it is somethin like , i was informed that the oil is due to it being an engine that is upside down so any oil left in will run down and the plug will look black if left for a while?

what oil is recomended for it then if not tts?

i have never been in for that expensive oil so i just get the green stuff for mowers or motorbike oil. its always worked in other engines without trouble so i aint ever bought the tts as i think it is too expensive, its semi synthetic or mineral oil i use , to be fair its somethin i dont bother about i just buy it were i can so i dont stick to a type just what ever there is.

i was usin aprox 6 litre an hour so i guess it could be just a little too rich

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hello all i took plug out because it has not been startin like it should, i found my plug to be very oiled up as in black oil.

now is this the oil ratio too much? or is it too rich? or other? i currently mix at fifty to one.

simonini engine , any advise would be good

Can somebody ban this stupid northern idiot

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sorted it was way too rich it has a lot more power and smoother now. thankyou .

why would i get banned for asking questions den its one good way to learn, try it sometime pal

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I was an idiot once, then I got learned. Now I'm smrt.

I don't understand the geographic slur, if it's based on latitude I could be a northerner too? Southerner? Gee I hope I'm the better of the two.

When requesting a person be banned based on their geography, please include a reference Lat/long for the rest of us lest we not take offense when we should?

On item worth mentioning regarding oil is mixing them:

http://www.ultralightnews.ca/articles/twocycleoil.htm

Raises a valid point not just on oil selection, but switching oils without cleaning the system of previous.

I've read the same thing about 4 cycle oils gelling or generating sludge in a car's oilpan.

Glad you got your power back leoibb, keep in mind the high mix screw will require adjustment anytime the weather changes significantly. That includes High/low pressure whether it rains or not. Leaning out a little isn't bad until you do it for too long.

Lots of folks out there just fly them until the run gets too long, then they get themselves learned.

:wink:

Also: could a brit define tick-over before I use it incorrectly (possibly again).

Your audience is global.

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Simonini had told me not to use synthetic, but the manual also says the never exceed EGT temp is 1076. Both suggestions come from someone who makes and supports engines.

I suspect they were referrring to break-in oil choice to seat rings and such where synthetics are a bit too slippery.

I run amsoil in my Mini2 now that it's past break-in. Castrol TTS is equally synthetic although is sold to have better mixed storage stability. Does it?? Who knows. How does one measure such a thing? I've never put much stock in oils separating in a shaking tank, and would expect a paper filter to isolate the parts quicker.

I add octane to my fuel, but we have 92 at the pump and mini2 calls for 98. Tried both and honestly can't tell the difference, but higher octane becomes important when an engine is out of tune, carboned or mistimed. Like running too lean, detonation does it's damages in seconds.

I suggest picking an oil and sticking to it though, for the reasons I posted above.

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i spoke with simonini the other day over oils as it is somewhat confusing and when i did get someone english.There answer was it dont matter which providing it is two stroke oil , they seemed a little unsure as to the mix amount too which i found strange, i asked is it fifty to one or thirty three to one , there answer was , ANY??

i think i will stick with thirty three to one .

on a good note been out nill wind launched twice and climbed well so the power is there.

just to ask about oils , i have had two stroke bikes and all sorts of two stroke engines and i have put any two stroke oil in without ever havin probs with them. some are or was a pain to start but that goes for a lot of two stroke engines, so why is it such an issue regarding the type of oil we use as i am aware the engine is no different to any other two stroke?

another thing which a lot recomend is runnig the carb dry and empty the tank? and use fresh fuel?

these are things i aint ever done i just turn the motor off put it away sometimes it is for a long time cos of weather, but then go start it without problems? so again i cant see why the big fuss of draining off and the other bits.

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33:1 mix is a safe bet for lubrication for sure. The reason folks may go thinner is to cut costs and also to limit the amount of coking that happens faster with a higher oil content.

Since coking makes for nasty hard bits that can score a piston bore, less is more. :lol:

The reason to be particular is just because you can't pull over like an ATV or bike. Engine outs are just a bigger deal is all and that's only true if you XC at all. If you buzz around a home field at a reasonable altitude, then so what if your engine quits. Same if you always leave yourself glide to an LZ. General advice is all. YMMV

Mixing oils may never cause you a problem, but mix the right two oils at the right temp and gelling can block your main jet enough to cause an engine out or (some may say worse depending on situation) lean your engine out, melt a piston/ damage a bore and cost a fair bit to repair. Even then you may never know it was the oil gelling that caused it since a teardown happens anyway. Not saying it will happen, just that the chances are greater when a consistent oil type isn't used.

If you run it dry and refill with a different oil mix, the leftovers from the last tankful are less significant then if you top up a half full tank so the two oils have lots of time to do their gelling thing.

It shouldn't be a big fuss, just something to think about when switching oils.

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just to ask about oils , i have had two stroke bikes and all sorts of two stroke engines and i have put any two stroke oil in without ever havin probs with them. some are or was a pain to start but that goes for a lot of two stroke engines, so why is it such an issue regarding the type of oil we use as i am aware the engine is no different to any other two stroke?

Because unlike a motorbike, we tend to run at flat out or towards the upper end of the rev range for anything up to a couple of hours. We don't slow down for traffic lights or bends, so the load on our engines is really very high. It therefore makes sense to use a two stroke oil that will tolerate the high running temperatures that we encounter. Also our air speed is fairly low, and fixed, and we keep our engines hidden behind our bodies rather than stuck out in a nice cooling airstream.

another thing which a lot recomend is runnig the carb dry and empty the tank? and use fresh fuel?

these are things i aint ever done i just turn the motor off put it away sometimes it is for a long time cos of weather, but then go start it without problems? so again i cant see why the big fuss of draining off and the other bits.

Because motor fuel actually degrades very quickly in comparison with avgas, the longer it is left, the more likely it is to misbehave at altitude. Despite what you have found, starting will deteriorate over a period of time. Also If left for an extended period, as fuel evaporates from the carb, you can be left with a very sticky residue that will completely gum up your carb.

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i spoke with simonini the other day over oils as it is somewhat confusing and when i did get someone english.There answer was it dont matter which providing it is two stroke oil , they seemed a little unsure as to the mix amount too which i found strange, i asked is it fifty to one or thirty three to one , there answer was , ANY??

Generally speaking, Fully synthetic oil is often mixed at 50:1 and semi synthetic at 33:1, because fully synthetic gives better lubrication at high temperature.

mixing at 50:1 will mean less smoke and less carbon and also you will be running a little richer because the percentage of fuel is higher, too much oil can cause an engine to run leaner and overheat.

Paul D

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