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Flying over built up areas


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What exactly is the situation now regarding paramotors over built up areas?

If it is no longer as per the original exemption to the ANO (ie not permitted at all), can someone point me at the updated document(s) that legislate for the changes please?

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Flying over towns etc.

An aircraft flying over a congested area of a city, town or settlement shall not fly below a height of 1000 feet above the highest fixed object within a horizontal radius of 600 metres AND at sufficient height to safely land clear of the congested area in the event of a power failure (whichever is the higher).

Congested area means an area of a city, town or settlement which is substantially used for residential, industrial, commercial or recreational purposes.

An aircraft shall not carry out any aerobatic manoeuvre over the congested area of any city, town or settlement

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I've heard that before Kev, but not yet found the documentation that backs it up. The information you give is certainly true for other single engine aircraft, and I believe microlights also, but I can't find where the exemption to the ANO has been modified, and the original exemption states NO overflight.

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I think the US has a NO overflying of populated areas policy. From the SPHG exam I think Kev's explanation was correct for this country. However, when we fly near towns we tend to give a quarter mile berth from the outskirts and a min of 500 feet more like 800 to 1000 feet height so we dont cause a noise nuasance, with the odd exception of dropping in to a mates house for a cup of tea. Admittedly, that might be worth avoiding too. Regardless of the rules we're expected to adhere to, if you overfly towns, at our speed, they are likely to get changed for the benefit of the people on the ground.

Dont mean to sound arsey Phil, but my crystal ball seems to work quite well, so I'm going to give you a nice smiley face to indicate the spirit in which this was written.

Dave :D

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I can't find where the exemption to the ANO has been modified, and the original exemption states NO overflight.

Don't do it then....

Thanks for your useful and helpful contribution to the thread.

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Dont mean to sound arsey Phil, but my crystal ball seems to work quite well, so I'm going to give you a nice smiley face to indicate the spirit in which this was written.

Dave :D

Nope, that doesn't sound arsey Dave, and a thought out response.

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Why oh why do some people seem to have a problem with wanting to know what the rules are, and therefore be able to comply with them?

Is it because we are such free spirits that we really don't need to worry about silly things like rules, lets face it, there are certainly some high profile individuals who seem happy to do it, so it must be ok, right?. Are we such Mavericks that the rule followers amongst us must be put down?

There are a huge contingent of paramotorists out there who really DON'T know what the rules are, and as such are FAR more likely to end up infringing them. It's only recently that I found out that plenty didn't know about the requirement to carry an up to date chart (nope, the one your mate discarded three years ago really isn't good enough).

If something as basic as THAT can slip by un-noticed, then I wonder what else can.

As for overflying, well if I'm at four thousand feet, then the area that I can glide free from in the event of engine failure is really quite extensive, and it's not uncommon for me to fly at those sorts of heights. If the rules mean I can make some short-cuts by part flying over built up areas, then I'm going to do it, and the chances of it upsetting anyone are pretty slim and unlikely to impact our sport.

However, the guy that regularly overflies a village at a thousand feet, if you're not permitted to, is far more likely to incur the wrath of locals, both for himself and the sport.

Personally, I'd like to know what I can and can't do.

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And for those interested, and who it doesn't bore too much, I believe I have found the information.

Indeed, the original exemption to the ANO forbade us to overfly any built up area at any height, however,

http://www.caa.co.uk/application.aspx?c ... l&nid=1127

Shows that a change was made in 2005 that catagorizes us as other gliders, and we now just have to follow the rules of the air, specifically rule 5, 'Low Flying', the specifics of which are here;

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2005/20051110.htm

Phil

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