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1. If you take a look at the latest paramotor magazine, nearly all the flights are at max 500ft and many well below that. Just wondered what height you generally fly at? Do you alwa ys default to heght first? Or just as you feel like it?

2. Whats the maximum wind you would consider flying in..if ypu ad a 19 aswell in your quiver..

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From what ive been told and read from the last few months, I've learnt that all PPG pilots hope you would stick to the 500ft rule for the sake of paramotors and the law, and other people around. I've noticed aswell that people do fly very low over beaches, but as long as you are 500ft away from anything in any direction, you are free to fly as low and as dangerous as you want... but at your own risk and not advised! :) Hope that answered that question :)

Wind, I was also told that 10 mph would be considered max... maybe 15 if your experience and want to push it... and if your on an expedition like from lands end to john o'groats ( Simon!) then maybe up to 20mph :L

Will stand corrected on any of these, as im learning from what they are telling me, and simply passing that information on :)

Thanks

Mike

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1. If you take a look at the latest paramotor magazine, nearly all the flights are at max 500ft and many well below that. Just wondered what height you generally fly at? Do you alwa ys default to heght first? Or just as you feel like it?

2. Whats the maximum wind you would consider flying in..if ypu ad a 19 aswell in your quiver..

What hieght you fly is really a matter of comon sense, if you want to fly low then there is a time and place to do so, IE when you are out over open country with very little chance of causing a niusance to anyone.

When I am flying somewhere that requires crossing road and being near to biult up areas, then I find 100 to 1500 ft to be a good place to sit, low enough to still get a good look at the ground and high enough to give you a good bit of time and glide distance should the motor stop.

wind speed is also not set in stone, flying in something like a 17mph wind, wich i have done is not too bad, it just makes the take off and landing a bit more tricky, once you are off the ground its a bit easier to cope with.

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, once you are off the ground its a bit easier to cope with.

Is that because the wind becomes more `linear`and predictable, ie: not so much turbulence caused by stuff on the ground, or....?

Also, what effect does turning into/out of/through/across the higher-strength winds have when flying?

Do you get pushed and pulled about a bit more or is it more likely to have adverse effects on the wing?

(been reading a couple of the accident reports!!)

ps

i guess you meant 1000 to 1500ft!

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, once you are off the ground its a bit easier to cope with.

Is that because the wind becomes more `linear`and predictable, ie: not so much turbulence caused by stuff on the ground, or....?

Also, what effect does turning into/out of/through/across the higher-strength winds have when flying?

Do you get pushed and pulled about a bit more or is it more likely to have adverse effects on the wing?

(been reading a couple of the accident reports!!)

ps

i guess you meant 1000 to 1500ft!

sorry yes 1000ft lol

turning from flying up wind to flying downwind can catch you out if you are ready for the sudden increase in speed especialy if you are close to the ground, if the wind speed is anything approaching double figures then gain some hieght first before turning.

how much you feel the differance in wind speed when flying will depend a lot on the wing you are flying, most modern reflex wings are very stable but the all move about to a certain degree, some more so than others.

try watching some videos of people flying when they have mounted the camera looking up at them and the wing above them, you can see some wings move quite a bit above the pilot but always remain quite stable.

Flying in turbelent air is something wich we will all experience at some point wether we like it or not, just be reasured that at no time up until the present have we had equipment better able to deal with that.

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I regularly fly at between 1-2 ft and i like to drag my feet as much as possible... But i always try to stick to the 500ft rule

I have flown in up to 20mph but this was on a down wind flight back from the Isle of wight in a strong sea brease. For me flying a 19m would be great but i dont think i would have the power on my V5. I have now gone down to a 24m speedster and the thing fly's like its on rails. I have yet to work out my fuel burn but its very close to the 26m.

A 19m would be a good wing to have but make sure you have the hours under your belt...

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500ft is the absolute min, in my opinion this is an unnaceptible height to be at for any length of time during a flight in the majority of situations, a 2 stroke is still very loud at 1000ft. We are all different and fly diffetent places but for where I fly i tend to always be at least 1500ft for most of my flying and generally 2000ft or more if the day is good. I would hate to think that my enjoyment was ever pissing anyone else off, its unfair. If you buy a house next to a road then you expect the noise, you don't expect a 2 stroke revving its tits off 500ft over your property on a sunday morning! Or when your out for a ride/walk somewhere.

Unless your going XC and theres a reasonable wind gradient I can't see any reason to fly at 500 and not 1000ft or more.

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Just a note about the noise...

Have you heard of the Noise-Cone?

Draw a cone from your point in the sky down to the ground below.

If you are higher, then your engine noise covers a larger surface area.

Basically, the higher you are, there is more area below that your engine noise will be audible.

So once might say that although it is slightly louder, being lower is less annoying as the noise is only over a small area for a shorter length of time.

Just food for thought.

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Hi Dan P

Why is this unacceptable??? If your 500ft away from any building or structure you may fly at any height you like!!!!!l Steve is also right about the noise cone the higher you are the further your noise will travel. We have lots of areas where i live that are away from the public so i use these for my comp/slalom practise.

I will fly into an area and buzz around for 5 mins then fly off to another area and do the same as to not annoy anyone for to long.

Flying at low level for a few mins is no different than a group of green lane motor cycles going up a track. In fact its quieter!! No matter what ou do in life you will always p1ss someone off...

A link below to one of my videos of low flying we do.... See how many people buildings you can spot

[youtubevideo]

[/youtubevideo]
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great replies everyone, interesting thoughts..thanks

I come from speedflying, so used to flying a 13m, 17m and 19m wings. I would like to fly very low (like slalom) but 1. in a clear area away from anyone else and 2. after Ive got more hours in as suggested. Guess Ill want to mix n match, some high some low - Id love to get to 10,000...and more one day!! :wingover:

BTW - Morgy that was one epic video - very inspirational for me! :D

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Hi David

Flying low is easy!!! WELL when you have practise... you have to have good control on the speed bar as this controls your height moe than the throttle. Its also much safer to fly at full speed on full bar especially when flying down wind low level. Coming of the speed bar rapidly will give you a big gain in height enough to get out of trouble if you have an engine out.

Thank for the good comment on the video..

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Morgy - lovely vid - (the first person was at 1:27 BTW, do I get a prize?)

Actually since I'm scared of heights I never get much above 500' but can still comply with the 500' rule.

What Morgy says regarding noise is definitely true - low level is less polluting overall.

Ad

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Hi David

Flying low is easy!!! WELL when you have practise... you have to have good control on the speed bar as this controls your height moe than the throttle. Its also much safer to fly at full speed on full bar especially when flying down wind low level. Coming of the speed bar rapidly will give you a big gain in height enough to get out of trouble if you have an engine out.

Thank for the good comment on the video..

Morgy, Since I first saw your vid I sometimes have it in the background when I'm working as a direct link looping on my browser at full screen. It's very relaxing (I have the music off and my own music playing). I do get sympathetic achey arms after a while though :wink: .

Dave is getting a Revo2, I have one and I doubt we could fly it with speedbar like that as you need trimmers right out before applying the bar and we have no steering input from the brakes then (only WTS). I'm only guessing though as I fly low usually on neutral (for the Revo) and use brakes.

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Hi David

Flying low is easy!!! WELL when you have practise... you have to have good control on the speed bar as this controls your height moe than the throttle. Its also much safer to fly at full speed on full bar especially when flying down wind low level. Coming of the speed bar rapidly will give you a big gain in height enough to get out of trouble if you have an engine out.

Thank for the good comment on the video..

Morgy, Since I first saw your vid I sometimes have it in the background when I'm working as a direct link looping on my browser at full screen. It's very relaxing (I have the music off and my own music playing). I do get sympathetic achey arms after a while though :wink: .

Dave is getting a Revo2, I have one and I doubt we could fly it with speedbar like that as you need trimmers right out before applying the bar and we have no steering input from the brakes then (only WTS). I'm only guessing though as I fly low usually on neutral (for the Revo) and use brakes.

good point stevie

like you say perhaps just trim in a bit from neutral and use brakes with bar - will need to do some higher altitude testing before crankin it low - however I will soon be using my Zion19 and see how that goes - no speedbar on there at all, just trims but I can put it on full slow to start - plenty agile enough even then. :D

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