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Personal and Third Party Insurance...


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There only seems to be one way and thats through the BHPA, ive just passed my exam and now fully insured. £80 for the year

There is another way where you can have your wing registered and now it seems you also need a fireproof plate stamped on your machine and its expensive. Nearly £300 i think and not sure if you can still do this !!

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Matt,

He is learning with Parjet Deano.... I would argue that he is in the top 2 ;-) instructors in the UK.

Not sure what you mean?

although I have not seen his syllabus, I have met a number of very competent pilots trained by him. :-)

SW :D

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Thanks for all of the replies so far...

Enquiries to date...

Contacted Flyingcover, they will only cover personal insurance, not 3rd party.

Contacted BHPA, they will cover me if I provide a log book of flights, get assessed, pass an exam and jump through a burning hoop.

It seems to me that its a Catch 22.... you can't get cover until you've a portfolio of flights in a log book, and an assessment by a tutor. So, you have to fly at your most vulnerable when uninsured, so you can get insurance....

Its like saying...drive your car after you've passed your test for a bit, and if you don't have an acccident we'll insure you....

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Due to the fairly negative response towards wing reg and a tiny metal plate I have gone back into research mode.

This is always ongoing until the day its sorted. I have less time now than I normally have but am still on and off the case.

SW :D

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Thanks for all of the replies so far...

Enquiries to date...

Contacted Flyingcover, they will only cover personal insurance, not 3rd party.

Contacted BHPA, they will cover me if I provide a log book of flights, get assessed, pass an exam and jump through a burning hoop.

It seems to me that its a Catch 22.... you can't get cover until you've a portfolio of flights in a log book, and an assessment by a tutor. So, you have to fly at your most vulnerable when uninsured, so you can get insurance....

Its like saying...drive your car after you've passed your test for a bit, and if you don't have an acccident we'll insure you....

The alternative entry system is fairly straight forward, its for pilots already flying that want to get a rating with the BHPA.

you only have to provide a photocopy of your first and last entry in your log book.

you have to sit an exam, wich is not too hard providing you do the studying.

and you have to have a BHPA instructor see you fly.

cant see how thats too much of a hardship considering the benifits of having insurance.

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If I understand correctly, BHPA insurance starts as soon as you join and covers you throughout your training, provided you are training under the BHPA rating scheme with a BHPA rated instructor. (Just as your motor insurance covers you while learning accompanied by a qualified driver).

I assume BHPA are in a position to negotiate a favourable rate with their insurance providers on the basis that the pilots on risk are subject to certain restrictions.

As a club pilot, my BHPA cover becomes invalid if I go off on an unsupervised XC more than 2 miles from the club site.

It all seems quite reasonable to me; BHPA offers insurance cover to its members on the agreed termas and conditions.

Other insurance providers are available, costs, terms and conditions may vary.

Take your pick.

Pete.

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Does everyone fill in log books then ?

Seems basically you have to go beyond club pilot exams in order to get any insurance for flying XC? At least with bhpa.

I guess there aren't many 3rd party incidents? In which case, as it's supposed to be about as safe as recreational flying gets, that it shouldn't be this difficult to get insurance?

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Rich, the requirement for log book evidence was raised as part of the alternative entry to BHPA.

Keeping a log of your flights is a good idea whether or not you wnat to join BHPA. Flight logs allow you to keep track of equipment service requirements, monitor your motors average fuel consumption, monitor your own progress etc.

Yes, if you want BHPA insurance to fly XC, you need to pass the Pilot qualification. Any insurance will have terms and conditions attached.

If I were an insurance provider and someone approached me asking for cover to fly, I would want to see some evidence that that individual was competent and intended to fly within the law and show good airmanship. I wouldn't want to cover for "Super"Dell's legal expenses, for example.

Look at the 'Spanish Inquisition' that motor insurers want you to complete. By comparison, the BHPA terms and conditions seem quite relaxed.

If you've found an insurer who will cover you for £100pa without any qualifications, there are plenty of pilots on this forum who would be interested.

Pete.

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