Jump to content

Electric PPG


arty828
 Share

Recommended Posts

From the figures on their website:

At lightest weight (20.5kg) you get 30 minutes MAX battery life by running at an average of only 5.6kw. (presumably on a light, floaty wing, skinny pilot etc.)

To get 1 hour MAX the weight goes up to 28kg.

You can only use the full 15kw for short periods (no 10 minutes climbs)

Recharging takes upwards of an hour and a quarter. This requires a mains supply (or a generator!)

Working in the automotive industry, I see a fair bit of the smoke and mirrors used to sell 'green' technology. I also have a reasonable handle on the physics behind it.

Pete.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish the battery development was faster but it doesn't seem likely to that it'll be good enough for paramotors within 10 years.

I do think it can play a role for a replacement to winch in free flight within a reasonable time though. Small motor with limited capacity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish the battery development was faster but it doesn't seem likely to that it'll be good enough for paramotors within 10 years.

I do think it can play a role for a replacement to winch in free flight within a reasonable time though. Small motor with limited capacity.

I think the battery technology proberly already exists, I think its just not economicaly viable for such an application as a paramotor at this time.

an electric paramotor with a range comparable to what we already have could proberly be biult but the cost would be something like 3 times the most expensive petrol driven motor available today, and whos going to be crazy enough to try and market that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I know there isn't much higher energy density available than lithium polymer at the moment, except in laboratory environment.

In general I do think electric vehicles has a bright future, but using it in a paramotor is pushing the limit in weight and price. Hope I will be proven wrong, I would prefer electric.

Got an electric bike since a year back. That was a good buy, used it a lot. That it does work well for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish the battery development was faster but it doesn't seem likely to that it'll be good enough for paramotors within 10 years.

I do think it can play a role for a replacement to winch in free flight within a reasonable time though. Small motor with limited capacity.

I think the battery technology proberly already exists, I think its just not economicaly viable for such an application as a paramotor at this time.

an electric paramotor with a range comparable to what we already have could proberly be biult but the cost would be something like 3 times the most expensive petrol driven motor available today, and whos going to be crazy enough to try and market that?

Purchase of Petrol Paramotor, £4500

1 year or 100 hours ( based on todays petrol prices ) @ 4 l an hour = £548. (400L)

1 L of 2 stroke, per 50L of petrol = (at todays prices) £104.

So 1 year of heavy use on a petrol Paramotor will cost about £652. (if we assume standard increase in petrol) this will be around £870 in 3 years time.

So guessing,

Year 1, £652 + £4500 purchase

Year 2, £770

Year 3, £870

Total cost of petrol ownership over 3 years £6792 ( this is not deducting any residual value )

Just food for thought when a 53AH battery costs about £18p to charge!!

Paramotor Cost @ 1 hour duration £6800

18p per hour x 300 £54.

£6854.....

I suspect that by the time you add a service or two on the petrol motor you will be winning (overall cost wise)

VERY VERY VERY rough numbers.... Assuming you continue the Petrol Price curve,..... year 4 and your laughing all the way to the bank :-) MAYBE!! or maybe a visit to the Battery recycle bank! lol

Cars are a little more clever.... you buy the car, and lease the battery so if tec improves you can upgrade under contract. (STILL) looking at Electric vans!

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am with Simon on this one, when ever I fly its usually for about 1 max any times.

A thought just come into my head!

If I had this electric paramotor would I be able to safely bring it on standard passenger flight as luggage or is it a no no like petrol motors??

D

No due to the size of battery you are allowed on the plane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Simon has illustrated, the current levels of fuel duty are just about enough to make electric power appear to break even on paper.

This is in a comparison between a 2 stroke at 4l/hr and an electric motor running at considerably reduced power to stretch the battery out to 1 hour.

If the popularity of EV's grows substantially, I foresee seperate meters for charging, with fuel duty applied. Our govt. has to raise the funds from somewhere, if petrol isn't selling we can be sure they'll tax the alternative.

A very basic figure to keep in mind in any electric vs IC comparison:

Petrol has 13,000 Wh/kg energy density.

Currently available Li-ion batteries have up to 160 Wh/kg. The most optimistic predictions put future batteries up to 600 Wh/kg.

I am not against the use of electric power, but I believe there are some applications where it's useful and some where it is not.

Pete.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Upcoming Events

    No upcoming events found
×
×
  • Create New...