Jump to content

Paramotor Prices


So what is a reasonable sensible price  

24 members have voted

  1. 1. So what is a reasonable sensible price

    • £3500-£4000
      12
    • £4000-£4500
      11
    • £4500-£5000
      0
    • I got loads of money
      2


Recommended Posts

As a comparison the X-Generation Polini Thor 200 is available for €5200. That's about £4300.

So I've opted for the middle choice.

Cheers, Alan

Sorry about that Alan but Im old school and not in to Euros :lol::lol:

I still use them old things (now and then) called inches. :shock:

Its what we used before millimetres for all you youngsters out there.

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The current crop of paramotors costing £5.5k + is getting ridiculously close to small family hatchback prices, which are massively more complicated, much more reliable with better warranties etc .... I know it is down to economies of scale and the latest paramotors have some great (but minor) improvements, but really anything over £3.5k seems hard to justify.

We are paying a premium for an 'aircraft' when they are not even aviation certified ..... :?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

£3500 should buy you a decent machine looking at what goes into them, but it seems that £5000+ is becoming more common.

How much could you buy an engine for? Thor 200 ?

When you start milling everything from billet it's going to cost more than just rolling ally tube, also parajet use the hydroformed aero section that's got to be considerably more expensive than stock tube.

As aquatix said its down to production numbers the more you make the cheaper it gets.

I can't see me ever buying a new Paramotor as their are to many rich mid life crisis types who buy all the kit and give up :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You and I can buy a Polini Thor 200 for 2.4k, so you can assume Parajet are paying Polini approx 1.8 - 2k for them. So 3.5k for Cage, Chassis, Arms, Harness, Prop and Tank (including dealers profit margin). I'd hate to see the price of spare parts if you bend it! :shock:

TBH. I was suprised when Bailey announced the price of the V5 last year, but people seem to like them (and be buying them) I hope other manufacturers take note and start to produce well designed, reliable, lightweight paramotors at a good pricepoint, as they'd make a killing...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be fair there a lot of work and tooling go into a build and when you break it down and take off the dreaded 20% tax include overheads such as premises, utlities, rates, wages, heating, advertising, r&d etc i would imagine there not as much as you think to be made.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be fair there a lot of work and tooling go into a build and when you break it down and take off the dreaded 20% tax include overheads such as premises, utlities, rates, wages, heating, advertising, r&d etc i would imagine there not as much as you think to be made.

Totally agree with you on this, The overheads in this country are crippling all small business.

But Im sure there is a good market out there for a basic reliable paramotor.

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You will most likely find that the importing country pats less tax than us. When you export you do not include the 20% UK tax. (hence why they pay local tax)

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess the question is not whether it costs lots to CNC nice shapes out of solid blocks of aero grade alluminium but rather what do you gain as a customer?

I dont know a lot about paramotors, but I have some experience in making technology products. And making a product in a low volume luxury market that has "good value" attached often means you sell less for less money as everyone boasts about how much better their superlite is for twice the price.

I can see more power is useful if you are larger, reliability, quietness, weight, being able to easily take it apart for transport.

But when it comes to shaped aerofoil sections in the frame when there is a great big shaggy pilot sitting in front of it I start to lose my understanding of the benefits.

What I do know is that in a sport where a large number of people will pay to have the best...you want to make the top end product and charge accordingly. People will pay.

If you make a product that is a pound heavier and finished in a cheaper fashion and offer something cheaper with less margin, you usually find you dont sell any more. In fact the guy with the bells on sells more as there is a perceived value and mysticism that surrounds this top end kit.

The other trick is to sell manufacturer recon units for nearly the same money as new ones. Makes people think that the kit holds it value and keeps up the perceived value. Makes people buy new and feel they will be making an investment.

If you know a lot about paramotors I guess you can pick up a lot of kit cheaply on ebay, but you really need to know your stuff. From people who have started and given up with twisted ankles!

Andy

I have hurt my knee before I even started.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes- i agree.... CNC machined parts, aerofoil sections- it's a bit like streamlining a steam locomotive!

(no disrespect to the Mallard).

Paramotor manufacturers need to think 'leaner', work smarter not harder!

Costs definitely can be taken out of these machines- but the processes and materials need to suited to mass production.

GD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes- Glass reinforced plastic, pretty good- the injection moulding tooling must have cost a fortune though- but the product does look good, and is relatively cheap and light.

Would be worried about flying in very cold conditions- some plastics can get very brittle when cold.

GD

I was thinking the same thing... They must've invested 100k+ in tooling alone... What it needs is someone to setup importing the cheap, light parts from the US (or direct from the Far Eastern injection mould facility and pay them a percentage) and marry them to a european made motor (Vittorazi, Polini etc) There's no point buying a motor from the US that has just been imported there from Italy!

Assemble the parts in a nice double garage (to keep overheads down) and advertise on the internet, maybe sponsor a talented pilot to get a ranking at the NATS.... Job done :mrgreen:

:acro:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The trouble with glass reinforced plastic too is the material is very abrasive on the injection mould tooling- so there will be a lot of overhead costs on maintainance and retooling.

Also- because of cost limitations on tooling- i bet these guys do one size of frame only (for now anyway)

Miniplane are probably a step closer to the ideal situation with their fibre-glass cage supports- standard extruded sections- cut to length.

GD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Upcoming Events

    No upcoming events found
×
×
  • Create New...