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Forward launch technique


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Following on from Gordons comment about commitment with forward launches got me to thinking about how some of the instructors over here teach forward inflation.

I almost always take a step back and take a run at inflating the wing.

These instructors say to walk forward to take the slack out of the A lines then effectively 'fall forward' to begin the inflation before starting to run.

I can see that this prevents a sudden pull on the line attachment points but guess that it may not be too effective in nil wind.

Any thought?

Cheers,

Alan

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Following on from Gordons comment about commitment with forward launches got me to thinking about how some of the instructors over here teach forward inflation.

I almost always take a step back and take a run at inflating the wing.

These instructors say to walk forward to take the slack out of the A lines then effectively 'fall forward' to begin the inflation before starting to run.

I can see that this prevents a sudden pull on the line attachment points but guess that it may not be too effective in nil wind.

Any thought?

Cheers,

Alan

There are many techniques... different ones for different people- but me personally- no step back.

Arrange the wing in the horseshoe as normal, then pull the middle back further to form a 'V'...

Clip in as normal, then centre yourself on the risers, centre of the wing- getting equal pressure on both sets of lines- keeping them tight.

Pick your point on the horizon, then eyes forward, arms at 3 and 9 o'clock- and run, pulling the wing up with your waist....Gently allow the risers to rise, keep the eyes forward and dont stop running.

As the wing comes up to 50degrees or so, keep gentle pressure with your thumbs on the back of the A lines and put the throttle on full. It's pretty important that you have the 'feel of the wing' and you know how it responds is before you try this for the first time- because you need to to everything with the eyes forward and running.

Once you're at speed, you can take arms away from the risers, and pull a little brake to get airborne.

I'd normally do nil-wind takeoffs on full trim to reduce the running speed necessary.

Hope this helps- as i said, this is my way, it works for me.

The step back gives an opportunity to go out of allignment in the initial run, generally you'll have better feeling and more control with a tight lines launch.

GD

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I think the step back was necessary with the first generation reflex wings which were quite difficult to get overhead, but with the latest generation reflex, or non reflex wing it should not be necessary to step back. Starting with tight lines (no snatch) reduces the chance of pulling up uneven, so is the preferred technique for me.

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I agree with all comments above.

Alan, I also take a step back in real 'bugger-all' wind but prior to the inevitable run, I also give a blast of air at 30-45 degrees, fanning as I stand stationary.............this gets air movement and gives additional aid to the wings inflation............................oh and it bloody works well!!!!

The motor is only used as an aid in nil wind conditions otherwise the minor snatch technique for me.

Mike

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Since I changed technique and power up before running to create airflow above the wing (and then powering down before running), I have never blown a forward launch.

It was quite a different scenario for me with the old "just run" technique.

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Same as really.. It's mainly a commitment thing, especially in nil wind! But laying the wing out correctly and into wind is crucial.

I take a step back arms out and fixed and then apply a third ish power then commit and go. Once the wing is up its full power and up up away :-)

Another thing, if you can't stand in a decent wind and ground handle your wing until you can do it with your eyes closed then you will always have problems imho :-)

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I was alwas taught to bring to motor up to full power for 20-30 seconds. This creates airflow & also ensures your motor can make full power (better to find out it can't whilst still on the ground).

Arms out straight to the sides & lines tight (to prevent any chance of them being sucked into prop - as already stated)

Come off power, commit, run, move under the center of the wing (by feeling what it's doing), nail the power & run as hard as you can.

The only thing I found that works differently for me is that the tips on my Synth sometimes seem a bit reluctant to inflate. I got aorund this by laying my wing out straight (not in a horseshoe), it's working well so far. Synths also seem to need a fair bit of pressure on the A's, otherwise they can hang back a fair bit.

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I was alwas taught to bring to motor up to full power for 20-30 seconds. This creates airflow & also ensures your motor can make full power (better to find out it can't whilst still on the ground).

Arms out straight to the sides & lines tight (to prevent any chance of them being sucked into prop - as already stated)

Come off power, commit, run, move under the center of the wing (by feeling what it's doing), nail the power & run as hard as you can.

The only thing I found that works differently for me is that the tips on my Synth sometimes seem a bit reluctant to inflate. I got aorund this by laying my wing out straight (not in a horseshoe), it's working well so far. Synths also seem to need a fair bit of pressure on the A's, otherwise they can hang back a fair bit.

I've found the tips can stay in a bit but it never worries me and they always pop out before i leave the ground. I've found if I lay out straight the outside A risers bring up the outsides first and the wing can fold up. I always lay out in a big V now so the front A's take hold first.

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Ive found the biggest help with my launch technic are two things first laying out the wing in a horseshoe and although i tend to take one step back the biggest thing for me was as soon as the wing comes up i look up for the wing increasing the throttle whilst looking up at the wing ive found this invaulable for me and im airbourne within a very short distance and with few failed launches........

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Had a chance to put my zero-wind forward technique to the test there on Sunday- worked fine, but was thinking afterwards of the need to stress that you generally need more 'room to run' when there is no wind, and you should be weary of any obstacles on the climb out.

While it's good to maintain a positive attidude though the launch, you must also be prepared for any eventuality- in that your engine could fail at any critical point on take off...

GD

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