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What customer service should be like.....


enzo200500
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So, there I was, after nearly 2 good days of getting my ground handling back up to scratch.

Motor on back, wing laid out, and following the instructions of my instructor.

"Right now 'pie man', bring the revs up to full throttle and brace against the thrust, don't let it twist you.

Lean into the thrust....."

At this point, I was starting to get close to being unbalanced, so lowered the revs and settled down to rev up the motor again.

In amongst this process, I had slightly stepped backwards and created some slack in the lines.

This in itself was not a problem, with arms out wide.

The problem occured when I twisted slightly to the right and the fun began...

The now slack 'ish' set of left hand risers took a fancy to the furiously spinning prop.

They decided to get sucked in through the only section of cage that Parajet decided not to cover in netting, and make sweet music with the drive belt (sliced clean in half) and the prop hub.

Lucikly the motor was killed before the wing had time to join the party....

I think the pics speak for themselves.

Now for the customer service bit.

A frantic phone call was made to 'The Loft' out near Lewes and they kindly agreed to take a look when I dropped it off at 12 midday.

http://www.theloftworkshop.co.uk/

Mobile rings at exactly 4pm, and the wing has been repaired and all lines checked/compared etc.

10 lines in all and a clean bill of health - unlike my flying attempts.

NOW THAT HAS TO BE THE BEST SERVICE I HAVE EVER COME ACROSS.

The price, well to me, customer service like that is priceless!! They'll get my custom for any wing work.

Please note, I do not lay the blame on anyone but myself. Oh, and that un-netted space in the frame. Which will be dealt with ASAP!!

This is the third time this has happened on this brand of motor to different people....

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Lines went in between tank and frame..

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Spare line anyone?? :oops:

P1010048-2.jpg

Just waiting for a new drive belt now....

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Hey Pie-man! :lol:

Full credit to the loft on that one.

There have been times in the past when they have been criticized for the speed of their repairs (which is why I normally use Aerofix)...but good on them for getting that done within the day.

Hopefully the drive belt will arrive today and I'll see you tomorrow for some airborne antics! :)

----

As for why...like Steve said, it's because he turned slightly under the power of the motor, that it brought the lines (which had some slight slackness in them) close to the gap at the bottom of the cage near the fuel tank.

Embarrasingly, this has happened to me once before, because I scratched my nose whilst revving the motor up. This brought the lines to close and they were sucked up. It was a silly thing to do.

The other time that Steve referred to, we were told by a chap on the field that day, was on the Tip-to-Tip. (I've yet to check the footage to verify that).

I've only heard of it happening on a Parajet....(and I do like my Parajet, so this is definitely not an attack on them). Has anyone had it happen on a different motor?

All the best

Steve

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Ouch!! :lol:

What a shame you looked like you had it all sorted at seymor's farm....

I am not criticising Steve or the teaching method or PMC and i am of course not an instructor but i really can not see the point of powering up to full rev's before your ready to depart.... In my eye's (and i am probably going to get hacked down for saying it) a powered take of is a bad thing and a back technique.... :roll: there i said it :lol:

I do warm my motor up on my back yes. but with the lines slack and hanging directly down with my arm's out to there max plus i lean forward so my motor/prop is pointing skywards.... There is no chance a line can get sucked in like this even if you do twist...

I hope you get the motor sorted before the weather turn's

Looking forward to flying with you soon..

Now ducking waiting for the flack :D

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So, there I was just settling down to my morning cappucino when Postman Pat rolls up in his little red van. 0800 hrs exactly.

I was at the door before he even got his van door open.

Such a small package, but it meant so much!! Oh and Steve, I DID have my speedo's on as well....

So, BIG THANKS to DAN at Parajet for getting this out.

The Parajet service lives up to its reputation.

P1010051.jpg

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Ouch!! :lol:

What a shame you looked like you had it all sorted at seymor's farm....

I am not criticising Steve or the teaching method or PMC and i am of course not an instructor but i really can not see the point of powering up to full rev's before your ready to depart.... In my eye's (and i am probably going to get hacked down for saying it) a powered take of is a bad thing and a back technique.... :roll: there i said it :lol:

I do warm my motor up on my back yes. but with the lines slack and hanging directly down with my arm's out to there max plus i lean forward so my motor/prop is pointing skywards.... There is no chance a line can get sucked in like this even if you do twist...

I hope you get the motor sorted before the weather turn's

Looking forward to flying with you soon..

Now ducking waiting for the flack :D

For the record, I dont a) do or b) teach this technique. (Not since the Simon Payne thing on the Tip to TIp) Same thing happened.

I don't see the point either. I suppose the wing and motor type may require it, but with all / any of the wings and motors I have used over the years. NON required it.

SW :D

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After checking you are central in the wing(lines tight) take one step back lean forward rev your motor no probs.

Take two steps back and there will be too much slack line which causes this problem. Thats what happened on the tip 2 tip.

This technic is for a heavy wing and need not by done on any of the newer wings until you can make your own mind up as to when and where you want to use it.

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Great service at the loft

They have given me a great service along with Aerofix.

Not sure why you run up the engine to high revs on your back with the wing attached with out being ready to take off. I did my BMFA foot launce licence in 2005 where we were taught to run the engine for one minute at full revs while sitting with your arm through the shoulder straps and neeling with you weight against the back rest through you shoulder.

This was a controlled position with quick access to the stop button if it felt that the thrust was not under control. A few people have loss finger in the last few years mostly while starting there motor. If you can start your motor on your back then get some thing to lean against and run it for one minute to eliminate any air or blokages in the fuel sytem. But do this before attaching the wing , as well as the risk of sucking in lines there is a risk of the wind picking up and moving the wing in the lines.

I dont see the need for a power launch, If you think you have time to check your wing,lines and risers while doing this then you are going to have a trip or failed launch. Most wings will come above your head with a fast walk pace and give you plenty of time to do some checks to assess if you are ready for a take off, Reverse launches can be acheived in a 6 mph wind so it tells you what speed you need to do when doing the forward launch.

Again the one thing we have is a great service from the wing repairers in the UK, maybe the motor manufacturer will take note.

Personnaly I think Polini will resolve this issue with a motor that will not need to be fixed.

I flew a return trip of 67km each way to day on about 16 ltrs with 4+ hours flying . Polini 100 thor

Russel

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I'm busy in the field teaching this weekend, but I'll weigh in with my 5 cents on this subject tomorrow.

Suffice to say... I'll give you a fiver if you can launch a 34m Synthesis in Nil Winds on a higher hang point machine (as a beginner) without using any power to assist.

Some people do not have the power in them to launch a wing without needing some assistance.

But like I said - I've got to go out now, I'll pick this one up later.

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am affraid I fall into the full power launch technique.....in my learning days or early paramotor days :!:

(not that Ive stopped learning I dont think you ever do)

I never had the power in my legs to get a wing up over my head when doing a forward consistantly....

then I saw somebody Hit the forbbiden power leaver on a launch and it looked so easy :idea:

So I tried it ,,and as they say the rest is history it works for me :P

it seems to work on Paratrikes as they dont have any other option :?

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For "nil wind days" / thermic and variable direction, I use a power assisted inflation. Taught to me by Michel Carnet.

One large step back from lines taught. Half to full power for 10 seconds whilst leaning forward (just enough to direct airflow above leading edge) this creates airflow in towards the pilot's face as air is drawn through the prop. (This can be seen by watching the grass at your feet.) Power off and then begin inflation. I only reapply power once my wing is at the 13:00 position and I've checked wing symmetry.

I haven't failed a launch in quite a while and often manage with this technique when others struggle.

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Luke, interesting, that's similar to what I use on a hot nil wind day, perhaps late afternoon when very tiny breezes are coming in from all directions. I launch perpendicular to a line of trees (wood). I point the prop at the trees and (most of the time) a mini thermal is created dragging the air from the ground to the trees and I have a 2/3mph breeze in which to lmake the launch a little easier, (well, at least the inflation). Richard

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Michel Carnet, who's he? ;-)

there are many versions of powered launch and the reasons for why it should be taught and used. I for one can't run with weight on my back due to compressed vertebra so rely on power to get me out the blocks.

So I don't see a problem with it being taught as long as long it's used in the right situations with clear briefing and debrief.

It's not a magical fix to forward launch but like most things in life it's another tool to getting a job done.

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I don't know many wings that will launch smoothly just by walking forward at 6mph without wind or power... Most people would have to lean forward to get enough power from their legs, which is fine in a PG alpine launch where you keep this forward position - but not good for PPG where you need to straighten up and potentially unload the wing.

Blipping the throttle to create airflow, then off then on again once the wing comes up is one solution - but creates its own problems as some motors suffer more from gyroscopic twisting if power is applied while the plane of the prop changes. Some walbro carburettors also make this worse by having a 'flat spot' between low and high rpm which can cause a sudden surge in power if not smoothly applied.

A steady 1/4 - 1/3 power seems to work best for me, giving a bit of airflow assistance to the wing and replacing leg power enough to stay straight as the wing comes overhead and into the run. Power is then smoothly increased when all is straight and good to go. Maybe its my height and how the motor sits, so others have found alternative techniques ?

Much as I love Dudek wings, they are probably the ones that need power launches most - particularly if they have been laid out on damp ground (even for a minute or two) as they don't have water repellent coatings and soak up water like a sponge, becoming very heavy to launch.

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Back on topic I saw the undisputed best customer service from Parajet last month while on holiday in the Alps. A mate had (yet more) problems with his new Volution 2, but they got replacement parts out and had them fitted by the team mechanic Kester Haynes, so he was soon back in the air.

Parajet replaced (and supplied a spare set free of charge) everything from the flywheel / stator / ignition coil etc - and have also promised to fit a complete new engine for him (with upgraded components) over winter while he's not using it !!

It doesn't excuse the high number of faults / problems with the machine, and I'd prefer a motor that didn't break down ..... but if I had to have a faulty paramotor I would pray it was a Parajet ! :lol:

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