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lee_d
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hi

thanks for that

has this always been the case as i done some paragliding training to elementry pilot level about 15 years ago and i am sure at the time they said to fly you needed to get your club pilot to fly with others and your pilot exam to fly solo

regards

lee

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hi

thanks for that

has this always been the case as i done some paragliding training to elementry pilot level about 15 years ago and i am sure at the time they said to fly you needed to get your club pilot to fly with others and your pilot exam to fly solo

regards

lee

Yes, it has always been the case. I was also told the same as you, which seems to be the line that you are told by BHPA schools. The reasoning behind it is that the sites that they fly from are controlled by the schools and they insist that everyone has had training.

But it never stopped any individual flying from a non school site that they had access to.

The same sort of principle applies in the paramotoring world. i.e. You can only fly from the Membury site if you are a club member.

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it never stopped any individual flying from a non school site that they had access to.

While its true that you can't stop someone buying a wing off ebay and jumping off the nearest mountain, most paragliding sites in the UK are maintained by the local clubs who have negotiated (and pay for) access with the land owners. Usually this requires pilots to hold a BHPA (or equivalent) rating with 3rd party liability insurance. Sites have been jeopardised or lost due to incidents involving non qualified pilots breaching these rules.

Although I prefer Scotland's 'right to roam' policy on access to the countryside, the rules are there for safety - in the same way that you would not want unqualified & uninsured drivers on the roads next to you.

Paramotoring is similar in that most of the 'rules' relate to the site you launch from, and although no formal qualification is legally required there are severe penalties for breaching Air Law. Beyond that of course there is always the most severe death penalty which can be summarily enforced by Judge Gravity at any time for serious errors ....... :wink:

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it never stopped any individual flying from a non school site that they had access to.

While its true that you can't stop someone buying a wing off ebay and jumping off the nearest mountain, most paragliding sites in the UK are maintained by the local clubs who have negotiated (and pay for) access with the land owners. Usually this requires pilots to hold a BHPA (or equivalent) rating with 3rd party liability insurance. Sites have been jeopardised or lost due to incidents involving non qualified pilots breaching these rules.

Although I prefer Scotland's 'right to roam' policy on access to the countryside, the rules are there for safety - in the same way that you would not want unqualified & uninsured drivers on the roads next to you.

Paramotoring is similar in that most of the 'rules' relate to the site you launch from, and although no formal qualification is legally required there are severe penalties for breaching Air Law. Beyond that of course there is always the most severe death penalty which can be summarily enforced by Judge Gravity at any time for serious errors ....... :wink:

I suppose I should have expanded on what I said to be: it never stopped any individual flying from a non school or non club site that they had access to. With land owners permission.

But that you for exapnding on my answer.

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But that you for exapnding on my answer.

Sorry I wasn't correcting you Barry, just trying to explain why the rules are there. They help to prevent incidents such as this one just last week: http://www.malverngazette.co.uk/news/8982605.Paraglider_s_lucky_escape/?ref=mr

The BHPA sometimes get a bad press, especially in paramotoring circles where some pilots see them merely as a hindrance when no licence is required - but they do a lot of good work for the sport (and not just the training, insurance, magazines etc).

Alan

(BHPA Pilot, Hill & Motor)

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But that you for exapnding on my answer.

Sorry I wasn't correcting you Barry, just trying to explain why the rules are there. They help to prevent incidents such as this one just last week: http://www.malverngazette.co.uk/news/8982605.Paraglider_s_lucky_escape/?ref=mr

The BHPA sometimes get a bad press, especially in paramotoring circles where some pilots see them merely as a hindrance when no licence is required - but they do a lot of good work for the sport (and not just the training, insurance, magazines etc).

Alan

(BHPA Pilot, Hill & Motor)

No problem at all Alan, we were both singing from the same sheet. I just think you explained it more clearly.

I agree that proper training is important regardles of what the law requires. As it only takes one bad pilot to loose a site for everone else. Let alone the accidents that might occour.

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Although we dont need a licence to fly or indeed require any formal training we still have to adhere to a few rules.

I thought I'd dig out a link to a pdf which explains our 'Exepmtion' from too many rules.

Its only 5 pages long and worth a read.

http://www.paramotorsuk.co.uk/pdf/exemption.pdf

but in a nutshell:

* Pilot over 16 years old

* Aircraft foot launched

* Aircraft should not be flown for ariel work

* Aircraft should not be flown at night

* Aircraft should not be flown other than in sight of surface subject to vfr

* Aircraft should not be flown over any congested city / town

* Aircraft should not be flown within 500 feet of person, vessel or structure

* Aircraft should not be flown when towing any article

* Aircraft should not be flown within any ATZ unless permission from ATC sought

* Aircraft should not be flown within controlled airspace

* Aircraft should not be flown within any prohibited / danger or restricted area

* Nothing can be dropped

* Give way to everything........

I'm sure there is also something in the Air Law section of this site.

just my 2p worth....

Woody.

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Although we dont need a licence to fly or indeed require any formal training we still have to adhere to a few rules.

* Give way to everything........

Woody.

I agree with everything else apart from the give way to everything bit.

I thought we were under the same exemption as gliders which have right of way over other powered aircraft like planes and helicopters but we must give way to balloons and airships?

Ian.

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Thanks Woody.

Had previously seen this but hadn't properly taken it in before. All very clear now!

Although perhaps unsurprising I haven't been trying to force any non-existant right of way over planes and helis!!! :shock:

Best regards,

Ian.

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A lot of that was made now out of date (now better) when our exemption to the Air Navigation Order finished and we were made Self Propelled Hang Gliders.

There is a great .pdf in the Yahoo Paramotor group 'Files' Section by Jeremy Harris 'The Law and Paramotor Flying', that gives all the current requirements in simple English.

Stuart.

Although we dont need a licence to fly or indeed require any formal training we still have to adhere to a few rules.

I thought I'd dig out a link to a pdf which explains our 'Exepmtion' from too many rules.

Its only 5 pages long and worth a read.

http://www.paramotorsuk.co.uk/pdf/exemption.pdf

but in a nutshell:

* Pilot over 16 years old

* Aircraft foot launched

* Aircraft should not be flown for ariel work

* Aircraft should not be flown at night

* Aircraft should not be flown other than in sight of surface subject to vfr

* Aircraft should not be flown over any congested city / town

* Aircraft should not be flown within 500 feet of person, vessel or structure

* Aircraft should not be flown when towing any article

* Aircraft should not be flown within any ATZ unless permission from ATC sought

* Aircraft should not be flown within controlled airspace

* Aircraft should not be flown within any prohibited / danger or restricted area

* Nothing can be dropped

* Give way to everything........

I'm sure there is also something in the Air Law section of this site.

just my 2p worth....

Woody.

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