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lightweight lipo battery


jock
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Looks like a good find there Jock. Most of the Li-polys, up to now, would catch fire if you didn't use a special charger. I would still be cautious and perhaps try a good long charge on the ground, with a standard lead acid charger first I think. If I'm right 4 x 3-7 volts will give a 16-8 volt battery. Same as my lithium ion which weighs a pound. 18 months and still going strong. Does struggle when freezing though. Pity. I like to fly in the cold ! :)

DG

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Guys,

I have a Solo 210 but it came with no battery.

However it starts first pull everytime on the hand starter.

The problem is that the electric starter needs a lot of ooph to make it work.

I now know I should have 16.8v old manual said 14 x 1.2 cell + 16.8v no wonder my 12v batteries would not start the engine.

I know the stater works because when I first had the engine I jumped started from my car with the engine running to test it.

I have also made a 24 volt system from 2 x 12 v to test it and that works. I also tried my 18 v drill pack that fired once on a warm day but not a cold day.

I see a few references to the light weight motercycle batteries but they seem to be 12v not the 16.8v I have seem required in the manual.

Can someone kindly guide me this matter.

Thanks

Hadders

:(

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how would this pack work with a CDI unit? like the adventure stuff that is 12v system. would the 16v kill the CDI? + the on board charger is only rated for a 12v batt, i suppose it could be charged on the ground first, but the CDI relies on the batt to maintain the spark, no batt no go.

Is there anything on the market to work on the adventure units

Cheers

Gary

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yes, if you leave the unit (master switch on) by mistake it flatterns the battery. the motor cut in air last week, on investigation 1 of the earth wires had snapped and shut the motor down, the adventure manual advises the ignition circuit needs a supply to work

Cheers

Gary

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Oh ok then. I have 2 different manufacturers 100cc engines and both run just fine with the battery removed.

Don't know whether you have the Racket or the Solo in your Adventure but both those motors have versions which are pull start only with no battery. Must have different ignition systems too then.

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Oh ok then. I have 2 different manufacturers 100cc engines and both run just fine with the battery removed.

Don't know whether you have the Racket or the Solo in your Adventure but both those motors have versions which are pull start only with no battery. Must have different ignition systems too then.

its the solo motor, elec start only with adventures own electrics/ignition system fitted

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AC systems don't need a battery, they are powered by a magneto system (IE flywheel with magnets and stator windings) . Some use a more complicated DC (direct current) system which is powered from a battery. If you are unsure which type of system you have you can tell by looking at the wiring diagram, AC systems get power from the mag and are grounded out to turn them off. DC systems get power from the battery through the normal system power and are turned off by shutting off the power.

kev

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  • 2 weeks later...

My Adventure F3 has an 18v NiCad battery which is the original from Adventure. It's both electric and pull start with the Solo 210 engine.

Don't know how many variants there are of starter units for F3/Solo but just thought I'd let you know mine's an 18v as I've not heard of an Adventure unit using 16.8v, I could be wrong!

Mine will not take long to drain the battery on a cold start so I always use pull start to start from cold to warm up then it starts straight away on electric once warm.

Justin

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well mine must be a newer model, being a + version and only having elec start, 12 volt and no pull start. has in flight charging, they stopped doing the pull start due to safety reasons? cannot remember what yr. I think it is the cylinder head, ignition type, poss pipe and carb model, not sure though, Im sure someone will enlighten us. The F4 looks identical but with a bigger cage

Cheers

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well mine must be a newer model, being a + version and only having elec start, 12 volt and no pull start. has in flight charging, they stopped doing the pull start due to safety reasons? cannot remember what yr. I think it is the cylinder head, ignition type, poss pipe and carb model, not sure though, Im sure someone will enlighten us. The F4 looks identical but with a bigger cage

Cheers

Just to let you all know you can put up to 3 times the voltage through a dc motor as long as it is in short bursts, so you could put 36v through a 12v starter ok.

doing this causes the starter to spin faster and aid starting so you would not be cranking it over for a long time.

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Hi Cobra,

Thats interesting to know thanks. No in-flight charging on mine and I would imagine the 18v battery would be expensive to replace. 12v would have been much handier and easier to source a battery.

Do you know what the issues on safety the pull start had? I only use it for cold starting on the ground. I would imagine it difficult to use pullstart in flight but not flown the thing yet so can't comment.

Justin

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Justin

I have a pdf manual and op guide that I will email you, pm your email address

this is copied out of the manual

Since the beginning of 2001, for safety reasons

and to prevent pilots from hurting themselves,

Adventure have ceased to equip their paramotors

with hand-starter systems .[/b]

so I suppose thats dated your unit.

what carb do you have on it? how is the battery made up? is it cyclone 2v cells as used on mine or are they individual sub c sized cells. you can tell by the lumps poss 14 0r 16 cells

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its the current that kills motors . I would not put 36v through mine as the mass increase in current could and will poss burn the windings out

as I said in short bursts 2-5 seconds max which should be enough to start your motor, if not then you should sort the motor out so it does start.

Edited by Guest
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Hi Cobra,

Thats interesting to know thanks. No in-flight charging on mine and I would imagine the 18v battery would be expensive to replace. 12v would have been much handier and easier to source a battery.

Do you know what the issues on safety the pull start had? I only use it for cold starting on the ground. I would imagine it difficult to use pullstart in flight but not flown the thing yet so can't comment.

Justin

!8v cordless drill battery, a lot of people are using them and if you look around you can get them at a really good price.

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Cobra,

Thats brilliant, thanks for that I will PM you my email address.

The battery is sub C's made up of 15 1.2v cells. I have priced them up to make a pack up soldering individual cells together which is still quite expensive. My original battery still seems ok but it won't last forever due to it's age.

The carb is a Walbro 32 but seems to operate very well at the moment. I've got a carb kit on standby and other than a K&N style air filter it's a standard machine.

Pete,

The 18v drill battery sounds a great idea! As it happens I've got a Dewalt drill with an 18v 2A battery (well three batteries :D ) on my work van I could try. How does this sound to you?

Thanks guys,

Justin

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sounds good, you may have to split the drill pack housing to make the pack fit. My adventure has a walbro 37 on it, dont know the diffrence from the 32, I do know that if I stop the motor I have to re prime it before it will start again, other than that Ive had 3 flights and its not missed a beat yet..

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I will check the fitting of the drill pack. I'm sure my work won't miss one :wink:

I think the Walbro 37 is basically a newer version of the WB32 carb which gives a bit more power. I'm not 100% sure but I think the 32 and 37 represent the choke diameter in mm???

Cheers,

Justin

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A couple of mm difference in bore between the 32 (narrower) and the 37. WB32 also has significantly different architecture for the low/mid fuelling which will naturally cause rich mid range but can be sorted into a better overall running carb if you are prepared to do the mods. 32 (when modded) is more fuel efficient and less prone to carb icing. 37 will not neccessarily give you more thrust.

Choke is not a standard fit on either 32 or 37 but each has variants that can have chokes fitted.

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