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CROSS COUNTRY FLYING


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Hi all,

Still confused about radios! i have settled for a set of PMR's so that i can talk to my 'ground crew', at the moment i am only travelling out and back or in a triangle, next set is to see how far i can get, however this raises another question.

How do i talk to a chase/recovery car AND the various air traffic zones that i will pass (i worked out that i have a range of about 70 miles, and will pass at least 5 airfields.

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Well, you don't need to talk to the airfields unless you wish to penetrate their ATZ. If you DO wish to talk to them, you will need an airband radio such as one of the icom sets (IC A6, A22, A24). or one of the dedicated Yaesu Vertex radios which are prefixed with VXA.

In order to use an airband radio, I would advise getting your flight radio telephony operators licence. This is actually a legal requirement unless you only operate on the dedicated 'glider' frequencies, which would be of no use talking to ATC.

Technically, you should also have an 'installation licence' for your radio in your aircraft, but this is almost impossible in practice, as none of the newest hand held sets carry the required type approval. I would not be over concerned about this , and think it is unlikely you would ever get into trouble for it unless you were being very silly on airband.

You CANNOT converse with your mates on the ground with airband, this would be a gross misuse of the frequencies, and would likely get you into trouble.

There are NO radios I know of that will work on airband and a suitable frequency to talk to your mates on the ground. The closest to that would again be yaesu sets (like the VX2 or VX3). With these you will be able to HEAR ATC frequencies, but not transmit on them, but you will be able to transmit and receive on some of the common VHF frequencies that are routinely used by paramotorists (albeit illegally).

It is possible to interface two radios with one headset, and switch from one to another, or you could use a set of ear buds inside a conventional headset, with the earbuds going to one radio, and the headset the other. For this to work, you would need two microphones however. The only alternative would be to plug and unplug a headset from your two radios.

If your mates need the radio to track your progress, why not use a SPOT tracker instead. They can then use a laptop to see exactly where you are with GPS accuracy, and no dependence on the mobile phone network. It will also provide you with a means of simply calling for help in a crisis.

Do not underestimate the problems of RFI and wind noise when trying to use a radio in the air.

Hope that lot helps.

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If you buy our MicroAvionics headset, then you do not have to buy the airband radio immediately as the headset can be reconfigured by changing a few small DIP switches to convert from PMR to airband settings. Airband and PMR require different headset electronics to drive the radios and hence the small DIP switches.

Alternatevly our headset has capability to connect two radios to one headset.

Regards,

Eddie Cartwright

MicroAvionics

Hi all,

Still confused about radios! i have settled for a set of PMR's so that i can talk to my 'ground crew', at the moment i am only travelling out and back or in a triangle, next set is to see how far i can get, however this raises another question.

How do i talk to a chase/recovery car AND the various air traffic zones that i will pass (i worked out that i have a range of about 70 miles, and will pass at least 5 airfields.

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Hi Eddie,

Have you been on holiday for a few months mate? ;-)

I have sent you a few e-mails.

All,

I have an demo MA headset here if you want to try it for a flight or two, the truth is I hardly use it as I rarely fly with a radio.

SW :D

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i have one of those headsets, (noise canceling?) didn't know that i had to set it up, where do i get instructions? i use a cheap goldstar headset with my pmr radio.

i used to have a ppl so i must still have an RT license ? what are dedicated glider frequencies? do they use it air to air or just air to base?

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Paragliding frequency on airband dedicated to us is 118.675 I believe Bignos.

I have a Yaesu VX-7R which handles 2 meter, PMR and airband (rx only unless you modify - instructions available on net). Although, I have read in places that it doesn't truly transmit on AM - it is some kind of quasi fm/am thingy. I really don't understand it, but I have talked with people on other airband radios perfectly fine. I use it to 'monitor' - not communicate on AM.

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