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Can anyone hepl me with an airspace question.

I normally fly well away from any form of controlled airspace, but I've got the chance of using a fantastic field, but it's on the edge of airspace associated with EastMidlands Airport, so I've never used it, and I realise I need to understand airspace if I am ever going to venture beyond the training field.

It's just inside the the CTA D 1500'-FL105. area.

Could anyone give me an explanation of this, and point me in the direction of some good training notes. The stuff I've been reading has left me a little confused.

Many thanks

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Can anyone hepl me with an airspace question.

I normally fly well away from any form of controlled airspace, but I've got the chance of using a fantastic field, but it's on the edge of airspace associated with EastMidlands Airport, so I've never used it, and I realise I need to understand airspace if I am ever going to venture beyond the training field.

It's just inside the the CTA D 1500'-FL105. area.

Could anyone give me an explanation of this, and point me in the direction of some good training notes. The stuff I've been reading has left me a little confused.

Many thanks

Lat and long would be handy?

Pete b

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Correct me if I'm wrong but the base of that controlled airspace is 1500ft, you are OK if you stay well under that height until you clear the airspace, SFC means airspace extends upwards from surface level, don't fly there.

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That's what I thought, but is the 1500ft AMSL or AGL ?

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The vertical component of controlled zones above airfields is defined in QFE, Once you are 3000' or more above the ground, heights for controlled airspace are usually (but not always) determined QNE.

Pressure setting to give you your height above a specific ground reference point. Valid only while the atmospheric pressure in the region stays constant – if the atmospheric pressure changes, you need to change your QFE to suit. Also used to describe how a height is derived, e.g. "1200' QFE". (To help you remember what QFE stands for, think of it as your height From Earth)
Your 'height' calculated as if every day was a perfectly standard 1013.2mB day. A height of "1200' QNE" is 1200' above sea level on a 1013.2mB day, but on a high pressure day will be higher than this, and on a low pressure day will be lower than this. Also known as FL, because flight level heights are measured QNE. (To help you remember what QNE stands for, think of it as your height above a Nominal Earth)
Flight Level. Something like a traffic lane in the sky. Flight levels are numbered according to the height in feet but without the final 00, so flight level 85 is at 8500'. Flight Level heights are measured QNE, so go up and down with the weather.
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That's what I thought, but is the 1500ft AMSL or AGL?

Mike, you MUST, MUST, MUST disregard the advice from the 2 posts above as they are both dangerously WRONG. The 1500' mentioned is above mean sea level. In this case that means having the the QNH for East Midlands airport set on the subscale. If you leave the area underneath East Mids airspace then you should set the Regional Pressure Setting for that airspace.

Where Dan is getting mixed up is in the fact that ATZ's exist referenced to height above an individual airfield however they are not controlled airspace (A to E). Classes A to E are referenced to mean sea level or flight level. Transition to flight levels occur at 3000' in the UK except under the London TMA where that rises to 6000'.

Altimetry is probably one of the most coc ked up things in aviation and yet so vital to keeping our freedoms.

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By the way, a couple of other things to bear in mind:

1) If the base of controlled airspace is 1,500ft, you may find loads of GA traffic trying to squeeze under as well. Although I'm not a paramotor pilot (yet), I do have a PPL, and would recommend that you stay as low as possible, say 500ft. GA traffic will probably bunch between 1,000ft & 1,500ft.

2) You may provide a radar return to ATC. As you probably don't have a transponder, ATC will not know if you are in controlled airspace or not. It might be helpful to warn them of your presence on frequency.

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Yeah the comment about GA is a valid one as Tollerton airport is also in that general area - 10 miles or so and there was a helicopter in the far distance last night too.

The area is surrounded by open fields, so it's easy to keep low and not have any 500ft rule issues until you have left the area under the airspace.

Thanks to everyone who has helped & commented so far.

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