Jump to content

Radio Frequency


gaoler
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

I am very new to the idea of paramotors, I have experience as a bit of a rotorhead but fancy having a go at a more affordable method of flight!

I have looked at this forum and am a bit confused about the use of radios, I see everyone talking about the 2m band, I am a licenced radio amateur of over 25 years standing and as far as I was aware the 2m band 144-146mhz is a primary band for the use of UK radio amateurs.

Amateur radio cannot be used in the air either.

What exactly do users mean when referring to "2m" in these forums? Is it a case of using 2m handhelds with extended frequency coverage for use by pilots?

:?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum, but I fear that you might be taking the p***!!!

You come on here with gaoler as a username and expect people to respond by incriminating themselves to your first ever post!

Apologies for my suspicious mind if this is a genuine enquiry, but you must see how it looks?

Best regards,

Ian.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A lot of pilots are licensed to use airband, this helps when communicating with airfields if crossing airspace etc, also PMR is common for cheap communications.

If you are thinking of becoming a paramotor pilot then the type of radio you use is the least of your concerns, personally I don't bother with a radio anymore - text messages seem to be the easiest (and vague hand signals)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As soon as Eddie sorts out a linking plug thingy for the I Phone I will swap over to just my phone, for comms, GPS, Google Maps, Pics, and stuff.

Just waiting for some tec head to create air charts for the I phone.

SW :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Simon,

I would also be interested in a cable to link up my phone, especially if I could use the PTT button on the left earcup to answer etc.

Do you have someone working on it?

The idea of GPS/Phone/iPod/paramotor headset combination is phenomenal, perhaps I could even use some game apps whilst I am up there!!

NB it would need to be a long lead and not curly so the iPhone could rest easily on the flight deck of the reserve. I already have the NAC 2000 headset with the removable connector lead.

Let me know if anyone finds one.

Snowman :):):)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for info, unless things have changed recently, remember that the use of cell phones while airborne is not legal. There is not only the issue of interference in commercial aircraft (a non-issue in my opinion), but if I understand what I have read before correctly, when airborne, a phone can 'see' many more cell sites than when on the ground, and this can cause network issues. Your phone is talking to the cells, even when a call is not being made, so it is conceivable that a network provider would pick up on this, and if you look at the terms of your contract, could pull your connection.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll have a look into PTT for the iPhone.

I have a couple of apps that are pretty useful for those interested;

AeroWeather - Get current and precise weather conditions (METAR) as well as weather forecasts (TAF), which are used by pilots for their flight preparations. You can choose worldwide airport weather stations from the built-in database by either name or ICAO code. Data will be shown in its original format or fully decoded into easy understandable texts. Available in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian.

Tracklog - TrackLog is designed for the use in the cockpit of a glider doing cross country flights. The application can do the following tasks:

Log the flight path of your flight.

Transmit the logger data to the internet for live tracking.

Use the iPhone as a communicator with prepared location messages for information or in case of an emergency.

Moving map.

Flight data display.

A passiv Emergency Location Transmitter.

TrackLog could be used for:

Gliding championships.

Live tracking of cross country flights.

Surveillance of student pilots by the instructor.

Aircraft surveillance in flying clubs.

Helps rescue crews to locate you in case of emergency.

Inform your ground crew and friends with googlemap emails.

As far as I am aware, and it's only hear-say but the next version of google earth for the iphone will allow vector overlays and you will be able to import/export .kml files

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for info, unless things have changed recently, remember that the use of cell phones while airborne is not legal. There is not only the issue of interference in commercial aircraft (a non-issue in my opinion), but if I understand what I have read before correctly, when airborne, a phone can 'see' many more cell sites than when on the ground, and this can cause network issues. Your phone is talking to the cells, even when a call is not being made, so it is conceivable that a network provider would pick up on this, and if you look at the terms of your contract, could pull your connection.

this now not an issue with digital phone it was though when they were analogue.

Pete b

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...