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Mitsos reverse launch


alan_k
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The only difference from my normal reverse launch is the use of the C risers which might be of benefit in strong conditions. Depending on condition, I either bring the wing up with both inner and outer 'A's, or just the inners. As you already have your brakes in your hands, I don't quite understand why the author uses the C risers to steer with rather than the brakes except if very windy, and even then, with the added complication of a throttle, I prefer to hold less rather than more.

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I agree that less is more when inflating in general.

If winds are sufficient, teasing the A's is redundant as well.

Turn and load a wing, and away it will go.

I'm not sure how this method got branded mitsos as I'm sure it's been around as long as four risers has, but regardless it wins out over A's and brakes in my book for medium/high wind launches. When one becomes comfortable with this method they can begin to float the wing anywhere in the wind window partially depowered, and anyone having used both will agree that it adds a level of control that brakes cannot mostly because one need not drop any riser to offer inputs.

With brakes as input, there may be a time where insufficient travel exists and hands must come off A's to stop/slow ascent of one side, or overshooting. At that point direct control is abandoned. C risers are also more effective at depowering and disabling a wing NOW. Using A-C was stressed in my free flight training, without the mention of 'Mitsos'. It is a staple I depend on to avoid grass stains.

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Quote -I have not tried it yet but certainly intend to. Anybody else use this technique?

I use this technique when the wind is strong, Sometimes with A's and C's sometimes with A's and D's (depends on the wing) I find it gives much more control over the speed at which the wing rises, the speed can be slowed at any point, and the wing can be more effectively killed than with brakes.

With practise in lighter winds you will find you can raise the wing to any point, stop it, hold it there, then bring the wing down or continue rising, in other words you have complete control. It is however a little more tricky to correct sideways movement than using the brakes.

Paul D

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Quote -I have not tried it yet but certainly intend to. Anybody else use this technique?

I use this technique when the wind is strong, Sometimes with A's and C's sometimes with A's and D's (depends on the wing) I find it gives much more control over the speed at which the wing rises, the speed can be slowed at any point, and the wing can be more effectively killed than with brakes.

With practise in lighter winds you will find you can raise the wing to any point, stop it, hold it there, then bring the wing down or continue rising, in other words you have complete control. It is however a little more tricky to correct sideways movement than using the brakes.

Paul D

Thats really interesting.

Ive always used A's and D's, never thought about C's instead of D's. My ground handling isn't great (self taught PPG). I will definately try this next time I reverse launch.

Whitters.

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Flew today and yesterday. Used the A's and C's ground handling which was much easier than my usual A's and D's. The C's on my Action are on a loop between the B's and C's. I didn't think it would be any good but I found I could stanfd under the wing keeping it overhead with much less effort/input than I normally do. (normally rubbish at keeping it overhead). nearly said keeping it up!!

Not today tho, nil wind.

A's and C's is the way forward for me.

Thanks.

Whitters.

Quote -I have not tried it yet but certainly intend to. Anybody else use this technique?

I use this technique when the wind is strong, Sometimes with A's and C's sometimes with A's and D's (depends on the wing) I find it gives much more control over the speed at which the wing rises, the speed can be slowed at any point, and the wing can be more effectively killed than with brakes.

With practise in lighter winds you will find you can raise the wing to any point, stop it, hold it there, then bring the wing down or continue rising, in other words you have complete control. It is however a little more tricky to correct sideways movement than using the brakes.

Paul D

Thats really interesting.

Ive always used A's and D's, never thought about C's instead of D's. My ground handling isn't great (self taught PPG). I will definately try this next time I reverse launch.

Whitters.

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