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Just curious. I live within the inner boundaries of an airport and although they are happy to let me fly in controlled Airspace, they do want me to have both an air band radio, but also insisting on having a transponder.   They are pretty easy about flying within the space, although I'm over 8 Miles from the runway, I am close enough to planes on there finals at 3000ft and descending glide slope.  I'm finding it impossible to solve using foot launch.  Any help greatly appreciated.  (And yes I know what many will suggest about leaving controlled Airspace..lol) 

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1 hour ago, alan_k said:

With pedant mode fully engaged (😁),  technically that's not a transponder but rather an ADS-B transceiver. Also you can't change the code, should ATC so desire. However it is portable, has a good battery life and will let those with ADS-B in see you. Falls within the remit of Electronic Conspicuity the CAA have been banging on about for a while. You also need to preprogram it with an ICAO Hex address you'll need to apply for (as well as your call sign). Plus you'll need an OFCOM licence for it in addition to your FRTOL.

(this is a road I have gone down 😉)

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1 hour ago, chrsfrwll said:

With pedant mode fully engaged (😁),  technically that's not a transponder but rather an ADS-B transceiver. Also you can't change the code, should ATC so desire. However it is portable, has a good battery life and will let those with ADS-B in see you. Falls within the remit of Electronic Conspicuity the CAA have been banging on about for a while. You also need to preprogram it with an ICAO Hex address you'll need to apply for (as well as your call sign). Plus you'll need an OFCOM licence for it in addition to your FRTOL.

(this is a road I have gone down 😉)

Appreciate the help.  As long as they can see me, I'm good. All I need to do is give them a call, let them know I'm intending on flying and give them a brief flight plan and they are happy.  I'm surprised at how helpful the IAA and airport tower has been so far.  This is the key to allowing me to fly in my local area and the price is well worth it for saving me the time to take off outside the controlled Airspace zone.  Thanks guys.  👏👏👏👏👍👍👍

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2 hours ago, Reagrove House said:

Appreciate the help.  As long as they can see me, I'm good. All I need to do is give them a call, let them know I'm intending on flying and give them a brief flight plan and they are happy.  I'm surprised at how helpful the IAA and airport tower has been so far.  This is the key to allowing me to fly in my local area and the price is well worth it for saving me the time to take off outside the controlled Airspace zone.  Thanks guys.  👏👏👏👏👍👍👍

Not sure how relevant but under CAP1391 portable ADSB transmit is currently only approved for use in the U.K.

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It will be all good.  Trust me.  Ireland PPG is all over the place here. Officially it's regulated here in Ireland but honestly it's a disaster.  Not 1 single licence has EVER been issued in Ireland.  Lots of talk and meetings about meetings with the IAA and still nothing done.  The IAA guy in charge is a complete disaster.  Got better info from the tower and as long as they can see me, all is good. Fixed code on the transponder and I'm good.  Just need to provide them with that.  Apologies for venting 

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7 hours ago, chrsfrwll said:

With pedant mode fully engaged (😁),  technically that's not a transponder but rather an ADS-B transceiver. Also you can't change the code, should ATC so desire. However it is portable, has a good battery life and will let those with ADS-B in see you. Falls within the remit of Electronic Conspicuity the CAA have been banging on about for a while. You also need to preprogram it with an ICAO Hex address you'll need to apply for (as well as your call sign). Plus you'll need an OFCOM licence for it in addition to your FRTOL.

(this is a road I have gone down 😉)

Cool, that is really good help. I live inside Teesside controlled airspace and have to travel to get out of it, which is a shame because there are some excellent fields half mile away.  So if I am understanding correctly, I need: a transponder; a registered call-sign; need to do a radio course and get a FRTOL; need a radio and an OFCOM license? 

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I looked into getting a Skyecho 2, haven't done so yet but probably will at some point. One question I had after reading the manual was regarding the callsign which requires a 8 digit code which for a Paramotor not being a registered aircraft, there is no official callsign. After contacting the CAA they told me that although there is no requirement for a EC device to have a callsign, and the fact that the Skyecho won't function without one I should enter eight zeros or eight nines. 

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I have been using an ADSB receiver unit that Patrick Coleman sells called Paradar. If you want to be able to see what is near you (well, those that transmit ADSB) it is really good. The unit has a circle of LED's that represent the compass and simply lights up where the other aircraft are. I fly near RAF training jets and they all use ADSB. You also get an LED showing you north.

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1 hour ago, AndyB said:

Cool, that is really good help. I live inside Teesside controlled airspace and have to travel to get out of it, which is a shame because there are some excellent fields half mile away.  So if I am understanding correctly, I need: a transponder; a registered call-sign; need to do a radio course and get a FRTOL; need a radio and an OFCOM license? 

I was talking about what was needed to use SkyEcho, in response to Alan calling it a transponder, which it’s not. However the the OP mentioned he can fly in his local controlled airspace in Ireland subject to him having a transponder and radio. 

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3 hours ago, chrsfrwll said:

I was talking about what was needed to use SkyEcho, in response to Alan calling it a transponder, which it’s not. However the the OP mentioned he can fly in his local controlled airspace in Ireland subject to him having a transponder and radio. 

Yes, I know. But I could also fly in class D here if I had radio and the transponder. I think transponder not compulsory but my local ATC are not happy without one.  

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8 hours ago, AndyB said:

Yes, I know. But I could also fly in class D here if I had radio and the transponder. I think transponder not compulsory but my local ATC are not happy without one.  

Ah, ok. However, as I mentioned above, the SkyEcho isn't a transponder, it's a transceiver. It'll only transmit the standard VFR Squawk code 7000 and in a different Downlink Format field from other aircraft transponders and can't be interrogated. However it would be recognized by ATC as orginating from an EC device, so you may get away with it. But yes, need a radio, do a course to get your FRTOL, and also an OFCOM licence. You also need to get an ICAO hex code. Call sign is some what arbitrary in our cases, as we're not registered, but you'll need one when communicating with ATC and if you have one in your SkyEcho (there's a field for it when setting up) it'd be good if it was the same as the one you used over the radio! 😁

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15 hours ago, AndyB said:

Cool, that is really good help. I live inside Teesside controlled airspace and have to travel to get out of it, which is a shame because there are some excellent fields half mile away.  So if I am understanding correctly, I need: a transponder; a registered call-sign; need to do a radio course and get a FRTOL; need a radio and an OFCOM license? 

It will vary significantly between airports and airspace. 

Some wont allow microlights for example, due to their low air speed mainly. Does a paramotor have the required precision altimeter, with ability to set QNH easily. Or an accurate compass to maintain a bearing.

The OP sounds like he has a very understanding ATC, and probably a fairly quiet one. I'd be surprised if many others got the same response.

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