Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I’ve seen this on landing at Membury by at least one person but looking at YT it seems to be used mostly by paraglider pilots. What’s the theory here?

 

Trevor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a Paragliding technique which can be used when it's very windy to attempt a top landing. 

I know exactly who you are on about (the bunch) and I have no idea why they have started doing it. It can be dangerous depending on loading and conditions. 

It 'May' be a bit like a new racing driver (testing the corner before committing, rather than just committing) I think it is more likely that someone saw it, tried it, and now its spreading like an STD lol 

SW :D

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a paraglider pilot from years ago (my last new competition wing is 23 years old!) we would use this technique to come down on a spot landing. The glide was so good on a paraglider that it was difficult sometimes to get down that last 3 metres as you watched the end of the field getting closer and closer; or as you were about to fly over the spot in a spot landing competition. So you came in a bit high, and reached for the stall point, then let it fly again, reached for the stall point and let it fly again, reached for the stall point, etc. This would greatly reduce your final few seconds of flight and you came down heavier at a  larger angle of fall.

This is not needed with an engine on your back, you are generally flying a smaller wing and you are heavier due to the engine weight, your glide with engine off will never match a competition paraglider wing! Therefore you can work out the final glide angle and be much more likely to land next to your car.

Reaching the stall point is an exercise best done at a great height. Generally you can't just release it immediately and hope it will all work as a wing again. We were taught, to hold the full stall in until you were dropping back under the wing, ready for release. But each wing reacts differently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

someone will end up with broken legs or back doing this, This is a pg only trick for landing on hill as simon said,dont do it with a ppg 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this case (The people referred to in this thread) it's more of a pointless flapping and not the actual technique used by PG pilots in high wind. (basically taking up the slack +2" and letting it go) at a silly fast rate which the wing would not respond to. 

SW :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just degrades glide (L/D) ratio. Only used for forced tight spot landings and forced top landings in strong winds on a PG. Should never be used with a reflex PPG. Echo Jock's comments on "dangerous".

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did not someone break his back at ppg comps doing excactly this,pumping brakes and fell 40ft

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pointless exercise and does nothing At all...  A mate of mine does it but don't know why.. You get a much better landing coming on full fast. Not for New pilots but can be learnt in small progressive stages.. Once you have done it you will never go back to landing on slow trims.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does do something - it degrades glide, but I agree there's no point on PPG,

8 hours ago, Mark Morgan said:

pointless exercise and does nothing At all...  A mate of mine does it but don't know why.. You get a much better landing coming on full fast. Not for New pilots but can be learnt in small progressive stages.. Once you have done it you will never go back to landing on slow trims.. 

especially on normal landings (dangerous). Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×