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Can I fly in or near this chevroned corridor?


ian5708
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I have got an airspace map for the Coventry and Warwickshire area where I live. 

I can see that there is a decent size area I can fly in to the East of Coventry airport below the CTA of 4500'.

On the map there is a black chevroned area which I think is an instrument flight Procedures 'zone' with a radio beacon. (see attached picture and area in question marked with a red arrow.)

I want to know if I am allowed to fly in or near to this area below 4500'? 

It's obviously the main runway approach into Coventry airport and not somewhere I would particularly choose to spend any time flying in but I wanted to be clear of of the rules. 

Thanks, Ian

2018-03-31_19.20.11.jpg

Edited by ian5708
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Hi, I live inside Durham Tees Valley CTA. I often fly under the end of the main runway approach which is 3000 to 6000 and covers some of Redcar beach (I fly off the beach). The planes coming in are clearly visible and always much higher than the 3000. You can fly right up to the circular CTA, provided you are below the outer airspace (2000 to 4000).

The hashed part you mention is as you say, for guidance.

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Thanks for your help Andy. ?

The dotted circle is an ATZ(aerodrome Traffic ZONE)  which go from surface to 2000'.

Im not sure what the outer airspace is which you refer to (2000-4000)?

To the east of Coventry ATZ is the Daventry CTA A 4500'+

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I've just found this on the Legend which refers to the chevroned corridor to which u refer as an IAP.  I note that it says any pilot intending to fly within 10nm of this IAP symbol are strongly advised to contact the aerodrome!

This would have a huge effect on where I should fly if I have to keep 10nm away.

 

Screenshot_20180331-212520~01.png

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Simon W, in your instructor capacity, can you clarify whether I'm OK to fly in or within 10 nm of this corridor? I see that you liked Andy's post but the Legend on the chart may suggest that the zone may have restrictions that I 'should' adhere to.  I ask as I am uncertain. 

Edited by ian5708
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The more bothersome air-space restrictions are the solid thin black lines. I live inside the pink airport over Darlington/Middlesbrough, so I fly on the Cleveland hills.  That black line is a NOTAM. Clicking on it says "area of intense aerial activity, surface to FL190". Just after flying Monday, two Eurofighters came skimming over the hill!!!! They are based in Teesside airport and often fly here. 

5ac0b99cbe7ed_Screenshot(99).thumb.png.5e312b03d1beda0a4f275ad60c426c60.png

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27 minutes ago, AndyB said:

The more bothersome air-space restrictions are the solid thin black lines. I live inside the pink airport over Darlington/Middlesbrough, so I fly on the Cleveland hills.  That black line is a NOTAM. Clicking on it says "area of intense aerial activity, surface to FL190". Just after flying Monday, two Eurofighters came skimming over the hill!!!! They are based in Teesside airport and often fly here. 

5ac0b99cbe7ed_Screenshot(99).thumb.png.5e312b03d1beda0a4f275ad60c426c60.png

What online chart are you using just out of interest? Runway HD?  I'm going to be flying down in Cornwall and I don't want to have any close encounters with any low flying jets from RAF smSt Mawgan or Culdrose! ?

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ILS approach. Normally 3 degs vertical from the runway threshold. It’s too let you know but if it’s outside controlled airspace then you can fly legally within although be careful. 

I have had been spoken to by Farnbourgh atc whilst flying fixed wing through the ils approach (not much choice as it’s a pinch point) as if I had breached there controlled airspace. I told them I was squawking there listening code and was outside there airspace but listening in. 

They backed down and admitted I had done nothing wrong  

 

 

 

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Thanks for the info Kevin. I don't have a radio yet but I should  get one and do the radio course. 

If it's no breaching any rules by flying near or even in it I may well have cause to briefly, albeit at low altitude,  500-1000 just to get to the other side of it. 

I note that the Legend text does state pilots are strongly advised to contact ATC if going in or near it. 

That would be well below the controlled airspace above 4500'.

 

 

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  • 10 months later...
  • 1 month later...

And for info, aircraft on the ILS will be following a 3degree glide, as someone said...but that equates roughly to 300ft per mile.  So expect aircraft at 300/600/900/1200/1500 etc at 1/2/3/4/5 miles.  Further than that and they'll be lined up at c 2000ft out to a usual max of 10nm. as you see it night at Gatwick etc. Using that info you can plan how to cross the ILS.  

If you see big aircraft at 10nm or less heading at right angles to the ILS you can probably make plans on the assumption that they will turn into the localiser..

 

REMEMBER too that aircraft close in will be configured. Thus they will be making more wake turbulence. 

 

Fun this, innit???

 

I cant wait to actually fly a ppg...

 

Out of interest...how much wake.does a ppg leave??

 

 

Edited by DavidG4
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14 hours ago, DavidG4 said:

And for info, aircraft on the ILS will be following a 3degree glide, as someone said...but that equates roughly to 300ft per mile.  So expect aircraft at 300/600/900/1200/1500 etc at 1/2/3/4/5 miles.  Further than that and they'll be lined up at c 2000ft out to a usual max of 10nm. as you see it night at Gatwick etc. Using that info you can plan how to cross the ILS.  

If you see big aircraft at 10nm or less heading at right angles to the ILS you can probably make plans on the assumption that they will turn into the localiser..

 

REMEMBER too that aircraft close in will be configured. Thus they will be making more wake turbulence. 

 

Fun this, innit???

 

I cant wait to actually fly a ppg...

 

Out of interest...how much wake.does a ppg leave??

 

 

Thanks for the supplied information David. It is quite an old post now and I have made a conscious decision just to avoid this corridor out of common sense for maintaining good separation. 

In relation to paraglider wake, I have done 360 degree flat turns and slow exits out of spiral dives nd have encountered my one wake, which does redult in a bump and a flutter of part of the wing. 

I have taken assymetic collapses flying through the wake if wings in front of me, but it shouldn't be a big deal if one has a suitable wing for their experience and ability to deal with deflations. Thanks again. 

Edited by ian5708
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