Jump to content

Getting into seat


bigdaddy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi, 

 

I seem to have a great deal of problems trying to get into my seat when in the air. I have a bulldog frame and harness and I've loosened the leg straps a bit but I still can't manage to shift my weight back and into a sitting position. Has anyone else had this problem and have a solution to comfortably get into the seat. 

 

Last time I was up it proved to be quite dangerous flying like this as my weight pushed the prop to angle down rather than up. Any advice would be appreciated. 

Yes I do feel like an idiot asking this question but just seem to genuinely have an issue wiggling/ pulling the wooden plank under my rear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its definitely worth doing a hang test and adjusting your harness straps accordingly but there is an attachment you can get which is almost similar to a speed bar but allows you to use it as purchase from your feet so you can get into your paraglider seat. There was an older gentlemen on a flying trip I went to in Spain last year who benefited greatly from fitting one of these.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, AndyB said:

I can only get into my seat by griping round both risers and heaving my weight up, while yanking legs up repeatedly.

With respect Andy, do not encourage pilots to do things like "heaving their weight up on their risers" when getting into the seat. If you want to do that, that's your own concern but please don't suggest these things where new pilots might read it and think it's acceptable or a safe thing to do. I assume you are a relatively new pilot? 

43 minutes ago, bigdaddy said:

Yeah, I need to do a hang test - good shout. Can you think of an easy budget way of doing this? Setting up on the swings at the local park maybe...

I've done it using my kid's climbing frame (a sturdy one) with some climbing rope. I know someone who used their kids swing (again, a hefty one) with the swings removed. If you buy a Parajet they'll let you use their custom built rig. :-) 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope Steve. Unless I wish to fly dangling, not in the seat....then the only way I can get in is to lift my weight up. Getting hold of the risers by wrapping hands around the complete riser, just where the brakes would park, is by the safest way to do it.......because the brakes remain in your hands and are not pulled by the action of lifting yourself up. Thus, there is no need to let go of the brakes either. 

If I took your advice then I would pass out at some point from hanging around!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, AndyB said:

Nope Steve. Unless I wish to fly dangling, not in the seat....then the only way I can get in is to lift my weight up. Getting hold of the risers by wrapping hands around the complete riser, just where the brakes would park, is by the safest way to do it.......because the brakes remain in your hands and are not pulled by the action of lifting yourself up. Thus, there is no need to let go of the brakes either. 

If I took your advice then I would pass out at some point from hanging around!

It does sound like you need to take a close look at how your paramotor harness is set up and go back to basics. If you can't get into your seat without hauling on your risers I would suggest that you think about starting your set up from scratch in a hang test until you have it right. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thought comes from my early free flight days rather than ppg specifically, however i find it to be true for both for me...

 

Aside from the shoulder strap height being set wrong allowing the motor to hang a bit too low when standing, loose leg straps are actually the major cause of the problem for me. (I have skinny legs, and guys with stong/thick upper legs may find different experience)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The setup of a bulldog is exceptionally important and key to comfortable and safe flying. I understand that the blue handle (used for carrying) must be level with your neck and that the rest of the setup works from there.

My first thought when I read above was that you should actually tighten the leg straps to help getting into the seat... but I suspect there could be a lot more out of kilter.

Personally I think you need to get in contact with Clive Bunce to get it set up exactly right (he made your machine and would only want you flying it in correctly setup). http://www.bulldogparamotors.co.uk/dealers.html (Fly2).

There is also Mike Chilvers and Clive Mason... amongst others who are very familiar with setting up a Bulldog. Once its right its possibly one of the most comfortable XC machines out there. It'll also help with weight shift once it is setup correctly.

One last point is, if you still have issues, you can use your non-throttle thumb to 'hoik' the seat under your ass. i.e. you literally put your thumb between seat and ass and pull seat down and forward. Obviously only do this if you are still having issues, have some height and have parked the brake on that side. As others have said - the risers are not really a wise way of pulling yourself up.

You'll get it sorted soon enough!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lee, can you get into your Bulldog harness without a helping hand (or thumb..)?

I can hang-testing when wearing say, jeans, but the addition of my bulky flying suit seems to hinder the process and it`s become second nature just after lift-off to swoop down with the left hand and thumb my seatboard under my ass - it just needs a little help.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TBH I do the knees up, into the chair thing, but almost always find myself fettling about once I have some height. This is tightening up the front seat extension thingy, putting on some makeup, loosening the inner carry straps (I take off with everything super tight) and the proverbial thumb to get me fully back in the chair and comfortable.

Some of this is habit rather than necessity! I'm like a dog settling down in its bed... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try lengthening your shoulder straps to lower the frame on your back . Then tighten your leg straps so that you are lifted without the frame rising up .

When I was learning I was told to have my leg straps loose . This was completely incorrect and I found it impossible to get seated as I was too low.

I hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 25/02/2018 at 19:33, Steve said:

I would suggest that you think about starting your set up from scratch in a hang test until you have it right. 

Done that :) But still cannot get into seat without a little help. 

I am rather tall. Not only 192 cm (6' 4"), but I have short legs and long body! The shoulder straps are fully adjusted loose. When sat seated they are a nice loose fit. However, with cold weather gear (jumper, flying suit) on they are not loose.

I have tried leg strap tight, loose and in-between. I think the next step might be a foot stirrup someone mention to use heel to pull the seat into place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It’s the “yanking legs up repeatedly” bit that worries me the most. Sometimes you see people doing some really violent jerks after take off which scares the crap out of me as you see the wing go through a series of unloading events. Combine one of those with a bit of bad air and a nasty collapse at low altitude can easily result.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sometimes only a stirrup will do. I've spent hours hanging in a simulator tweaking settings, but it seems some harnesses just don't suit my 6'3" frame. Clothing does seem to make a difference - jeans are better than my flying suit. For paragliding my reversible harness and pod harness are fine, but my seatboard harness and tandem pilots harness (which are most similar to a paramotor harness) won't work whatever I do, and a stirrup is the only answer (or pushing my knees into the poor passenger if flying tandem!).

I couldn't agree more with the comments about keeping the brakes in your hands whilst reaching down to push the seat forward - I've seen someone stall and pile in doing this on a thermic day, and i've seen some pretty close calls with people flinging themselves wildly around as they try to get into the seat - hard to maintain control of the throttle doing that, and a glider wobbling around aand barely under control close to the ground is asking for trouble.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was actually wondering if my speedbar would do the job. When it is not connected to the risers I always loop the free ends back across the middle and attach them to each other. Hence it can only pull out a little as it takes up the bit of slack.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...