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first flight today on new motor


chewi
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wind 3mph gusting up to 6 did some ground handling felt great geared up take off was spot on wing came up a dream 5 steps and up I went

the hanging point on paramotor are low on wasp eos 100 which is different to what ive flown before well that's all good stuff out of way

I was on and off the throttle like a little girl which I think was causing wing to feel it was all over the place not good for confedence ended up landing

have video but wont put it up lots of swear and angry words on it lol

its not scared me but need to think how to go forward safely be gentle with your answers lol :/

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I think you answered your own question :-) 

Think of the throttle like any other input.... :-) Do it slowly.  

Ideally for the first flight on new kit, you should be finding level flight 'equilibrium' as a minimum. Our first flight ever guys are asked to do this for perspective as it is a basic need early on. 

Just remember to be gentle with the power on/off, I am sure this will help :-) 

SW :D

 

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Thanks for reply sw have much to learn to get back into flying didn't realise how much you loose when you don't fly for years take off great as I said but the feelings when off ground was like first time ever if I'm honest now thinking I panicked a bit when wing bobbin about may have been turbulence off village were the field is not sure which made me tentative with throttle

I have another field which I can use which I clear of obstructions and used to use

cheers chewi

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I am no expert at this however, from my limited experience, an awful lot of thinking and reflecting on my flights and watching others on youtube i would say this....

 

Make sure that you are not overbraking the wing...especially on climbout. Check your reach to ensure you are not inadvertantly holding on too much brake (i made this mistake once and was extremely lucky to  not crash...i kinda did but it was onsoft sand and i mainly landed sideways rather than full stall tail slide to terrafirma.

 

The difference between running along the ground and taking and easily maintaining level flight is only a few km/hr. Once airborne there is no need to reach for the nitrous oxide injection button. If anything once airborne, ease off the throttle whilst also leveling out the climb and just relax...your airborne and unless you chose a terrible launch site with lots of nasty terrain obstacles, you are actually quite safe where you are.

Some people seem to panic once they get airborne thinking its vital they get as far away from mother earth as possible...they squeeze and freeze, which is almost always a very bad idea (as is playing around with throttle settings all over the place when climbing out).

Think of it this way, each time you suddenly increase throttle, your engine is going to almost instantly produce an increase in torque and therefore torque induced steer forces. Then backing off again immediately begins the reverse..doing this over and over again actually increases instability and upsets in-flight behaviour of your aircraft.

Not trying to push his channel but watch Tucker Gott taking off and listen to his engine rpm drop once he leaves the ground. I used to think this was just a bit of showing off, but i now see a lot of merit in what he does. Once he has settled everything down, then he powers up to a much higher setting and commences his climbout.

 

In my opinion, if you are experiencing unsettling behaviour in your aircraft the safest thing to do is glide...even if that results in a landing.

Even a hard landing from glide is going to be a better outcome than a crash under high power.

Edited by adamjedgar
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Throttle rules for beginners:

At take-off, full power, quickly, no messing around. Hold full power until climbed to decent height. Always holding full power at take-off also gets you used to holding the same/right amount of brake on the side needed to prevent torque steer. ie. to climb away straight it will always feel the same.

All other times throttle is moved SLOWLY from one position to another. This applies to increasing OR decreasing power. Do it slowly. The wing will then avoid swinging due to throttle.

 

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I dont subscribe to the just belt on full throttle rule myself...i fly a very powerful unit for my weight...full throttle would see me face down in the dirt more often than not...i tend to use about 3/4 until i am well and truly airborne...even then my unit is so powerful i really dont need it flat out footlaunch at sea level.

 

Actually i think the wing has a bearing on this too. I now am the proud owner of the sirrocco i negatively earbashed to its importer 2 years ago.

One of my complaints was (and still is) its tendency to lag back under high power settings (risers almost touching cage), and its innability to keep straight against torque unless tip steering toggles were also used on paramotors that have no weight shift (high hang point)

 

On this wing/paramotor combination full throttle is actually potentially very very dangerous at low speed unless both tip steering and normal brake toggles are used together. Due to height differences in the toggles i am not even sure if i can launch it using both without an integrated system that combines the two? (I suppose it would work even though tips would be engaged by about 100mm when main brakes are full hands up?)

Edited by adamjedgar
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On 17/02/2018 at 11:48, AndyB said:

At take-off, full power, quickly, no messing around. Hold full power until climbed to decent height. Always holding full power at take-off also gets you used to holding the same/right amount of brake on the side needed to prevent torque steer. ie. to climb away straight it will always feel the same.

I wouldn't use that as a general rule at all. I don't need full power for launch. I also wouldn't be doing my climb with one brake applied - if you are having major torque steer then either change your set-up or if in the air use weight shift. Braking under full power is asking for trouble IMHO. 

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1 hour ago, Steve said:

I wouldn't use that as a general rule at all. I don't need full power for launch. I also wouldn't be doing my climb with one brake applied - if you are having major torque steer then either change your set-up or if in the air use weight shift. Braking under full power is asking for trouble IMHO. 

All 3 motors I have flown with require a small amount of left brake to hold straight climb-out. That is 2 different Parajets and now a Nitro. They have zero torque steer at about cruise throttle. It is perfectly normal to climb out on full power with a little brake one side.

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