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Found an adhesive for fixing plastic fuel tanks.


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Just wanted to share this. 

I had multiple cracks in my plastic fuel tank where the brass fittings screw into the plastic. Gasoline would rush out pretty quick as soon as my paramotor would go horizontal (like laying it on its side in the car) and of course the petrol smell sucked.

I tried Goop adhesive but petrol ate through it. It would eat through silicon as well. A guy at the auto shop recommended me this:

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=rapid+fix+adhesive

I've used it on my tank and so far it seems to be holding up. No leaks. I'm currently in the process of doing a prolonged submersion test and I'll let you guys know how it holds up.

It was either this or pay Backbone $200 to mail me a new fuel tank or pay someone to do plastic welding. I think this adhesive was the best option. Sets and hardens in less than 10 seconds.

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3 hours ago, kiwi k said:

FB could you not use the electric hot glue gun type:?:, as i know it forms solid but still with a little flex :)

Naw, hot glue is Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) which is not chemically resistant to petrol.

http://www.rxplastics.com.au/resources/RXChemicalResistanceGuide.pdf

Even if you were to use a proper plastic welding kit you have to select the correct type of plastic for fuel because not all plastic is the same. Petrol will dissolve one and not the other. The adhesive that I've used is chemically inert to petrol.

Edited by fuzzybabybunny
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There is another way i would suggest but its a dark colour in both forms, and that my young man is Q-Bond and its fuel friendly and they supply both plastic and metal repair products, have used the metal type on the inside of a carburetor float bowl immersed in fuel and still stuck 8yrs later.

 

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4 hours ago, kiwi k said:

There is another way i would suggest but its a dark colour in both forms, and that my young man is Q-Bond and its fuel friendly and they supply both plastic and metal repair products, have used the metal type on the inside of a carburetor float bowl immersed in fuel and still stuck 8yrs later.

 

So after doing some research, Q Bond and RapidFix look to be the same thing. They are both a two part liquid and filling powder adhesive with the same chemistry.

Checking the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) for Q Bond, it appears the primary ingredient (99%) is ethyl cyanoacrylate. You know it as normal super glue. Super glue forms a polymer when it comes into contact with water, mostly water molecules on the surface of the material you're adhering. And yes, it's gasoline resistant.

The filling powder is a bit more mysterious, but I will guess that it is simply a form of powdered ceramic or metal. It adds 3-dimensional structure as well as more holding power, stiffness, and filling of nooks and crannies compared to just the liquid portion.

It's basically like a micro-cement, and yes, both parts are very resistant to gasoline. 

You can make your own Q Bond or RapidFix by buying super glue and using it with fine beach sand, powdered iron, or powdered ceramic.

Just did the overnight submersion test and there were no leaks of any kind and the material showed no weakening at all. 

I consider the fuel tank fully repaired.

 

Edited by fuzzybabybunny
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