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Bear Grylls Mission Everest Forum.


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Bear Grylls (Left) Giles Cardozo 'Gilo' (right)

Giles Cardozo (Parajet MD) and the person who is responsible for building this awesome Paramotor , and Mission Everest Pilot will be LOGGED IN TO THIS SITE to answer your questions, for half an hour after the show :D

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The show starts on C4 at 21:00 hours on Easter Monday and ends at 22:00 hrs, so Give gilo 5 to log in and ask away. Please remember that we only have a short time so please try to keep it short and sweet so that he can answer as many questions as possible. If you are interested in the Wankel Rotary Engine please go to the Parajet homepage www.parajet.com and join the 'Everest Rotary mailing list' where you will be kept up to date with the latest Rotary Paramotor news from Giles

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We can of course start gassing now :D

A notice to our visitors, you will have to register with this site to be able to post a message. It only takes a moment and is 100% free.

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Giles explains,

"As altitude increases, so air pressure drops. At 15,000ft there is two thirds of sea level pressure and at 29,037ft at the summit of Everest there is only one third of sea level air pressure. An engine combines oxygen in the air and fuel to create the explosive charge that drives the engine. At sea level the oxygen content is approximately 20%, at 30,000ft the oxygen content percentage remains the same but due to the lower air pressure is equivalent to 6.5 %. Such a low volume of oxygen is insufficient for a standard internal combustion engine. Take a normal 2-stroke or 4-stroke paramotor engine to this altitude and it will simply stop running. In fact it will stop running at around 24,000ft as it simply can’t produce enough power to even push the piston up and down any more. Theoretically, with a third of the oxygen at 30,000ft an engine should produce a third of the power, however, the mechanical inefficiencies of the engine remain the same as at sea level and therefore draw a large percentage of the total power produced. This result is an engine that produces about 8 times less power and in most cases…especially for light weight aero engines…they just stop running."

SW :D

Edited by Guest
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Great start :lol::lol:

The end of Mission Everest is not until 22:30 :oops::oops:

That's 100% my mistake.... sorry :oops:

It is 100% still a go though :D Giles will be here shortly after the show :D

SW :D

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Gilo is on the way and will be logged in soon :D

Please do ask away if you have any questiuons about the mission and or the motor!

Our edit was WAY WAY WAY better the USA version

SW :D

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Hi Gilo,

I was speaking to a friend who I am trying to pursuade to fly and he said do you need a funny name to begin flying. Well spotted I thought!! Gilo and Bear :D

Anyway many congratulations a fabulous challenge. Well done for winning it.

Questions if I may

I am interested to know which wing you flew and if they were modded in any way.

Also

I am wondering as the air must be so thin up there what were the groundspeeds into wind and downwind

many thanks

Simon

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looks like the wind was very kind to you the day you managed the flight- what was the wind speed at altitude, was it as cold as you thought it was going to be, did you suffer from altitude sickness.

brilliant TV, well done both of you and everyone else involved.

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Amazing achievment. Pity the instuments packed up that could have given Bear the altitude record. Next time eh! :shock::roll:

Though a bit confused that I didnt see you with a wheelbarrow at the christmas do so you could transport those ridiculasly big balls you have about. :D

congrats Col.....

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Congratulations on building a brilliant Paramotor! Another successful British invention. The program was very exciting.

When you did the wind tunnel test, did you have the GPS and Satnav with you? Did you experience any failures then? Was it just the cold that caused equipment failure on the day or the altitude?

Cheers,

Frosty

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Why oh why were the comms so crappy?

It is a problem I'm hoping to give you guys a solution to before the Tip to Tip. We've got some throat mikes to try. The real problem with Tip to Tip will be air to ground comms as you get up into the border areas and then the Highlands when the ground crews won't have line of sight and mobile phones will be largely useless.

No challenge there then ;-)

Stuart.

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