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  1. Designed some new graphics for the motorhome - 3 layers of vinyl. came out pretty good I reckon. the dark blue is same blue as front of van, and silver matches the hymer silver.
    10 points
  2. I'm afraid this is going to be a long and probably controversial post. More popcorn required for this one. I've been flying PPG for nearly 10 years now, with a lot of air time (Southern Spain) 1500+ hrs, and GA (Cessna's and 'A' class kit planes) for 25 years. Unfortunately, I have a medical, neurological condition which prevents me from conforming to rules that are set by desk jockeys, rules that are not based on any informed analysis or common sense. As a policeman (retired) this did me no favours with the bosses as I tended to let everyone off, well those that broke rules that I believed were politically motivated, for example possession/consumption of cannabis, stupid non dangerous motoring offences; One day we'd be told to hammer the motorist with no discretion, and the next we'd be told to leave the motorist alone (wtf). My take was always stop them, bollock them and send them on their way without assaulting their wallet. I preferred to spend my time trying to stop crimes against individuals (mostly unsuccessfully thanks to a judicial system hell bent on defending criminals ). Going back to flying. I consider the skill of 'risk assessment' in any given situation a dying art, courtesy of an agenda driven 'nanny state' mentality that has all but been completely accepted. Perceived health and safety infringement has now made any form of risk taking largely frowned upon. This (IMO) is a huge mistake as FUNDAMENTALLY young men need to take risk... in order to have the nerve to go and hunt the woolly mammoth. The truly devastating result of this is just starting to show. "Men in the UK aged 20 to 49 are more likely to die from suicide than any other cause of death". https://www.esquire.com/uk/culture/a9202/britain-male-suicide-crisis/ Sorry, I digress again, back to flying. If I am honest, I can probably say that I break the 500ft rule with virtually every flight that I make, in that I will probably fly my 25kg back pack with 10 litres of gas at 20 mph closer than 500ft to some or other building, structure, person, vehicle). However, I can confidently say I have never broken this rule in my 1000kg Cessna with 188litres of Avgas travelling at 120mph , because that would be really dangerous, and alarming to 100% of those who would witness it. Those of you that think there is no difference between the 2 because the law is the law, should probably stop reading this now, as we are NEVER going to see eye to eye. But, whilst flying my PPG I have never broken my own risk assessment rules, which at any one time preserve the safety of any person, vehicle, building, structure. I suppose l liken a PPG to a bicycle (+ a few kg's). If it hits you, yeah it's going to hurt, but in all likelihood you would only be coming down if the prop was no longer spinning, and your speed during a flare would be similar to a bicycle, so my common sense says that it should not be subject to the same rules as a Cessna. I know I started this thread by saying this act by Green Peace will not help our sport, and I stand by this statement, not because I believe there was any danger to anyone on the ground, but because it was an act that was so high profile it could motivate some high level desk jockey trying to make a name for himself, or even trying to justify his high paid position, to sit up and feel compelled to take action and create legislation for the wrong reasons. As humans, we are manipulatable to the point that we are programable to think and believe virtually anything they want us to believe, by instilling fear, a need to conform and the need to fit in. However, some people; those that understand this, and wish to see the real picture, tend to put their faith in mathematics. They look at the numbers, and then ask themselves; ACTUALLY what are the chances of this bad outcome happening. If it's say 1 in 10,000, imagine 10,000 table tennis balls in a big bowl. One has a red dot. What are the real chances of pulling out that red dotted ball? I've gone off at another tangent....No I'm not stoned, I've just got so many thoughts on the subject ?? In some respects, this modern day fear of taking risks has had an unexpected but really positive impact on our sport, as it keeps the numbers low. Danny B is a good example of this. PPG was obviously too scary for him (I get that), but he felt the need to create this poor story about giving up because of other pilots (bless). This has the effect of keeping the numbers low enough to be uninteresting to politicians, unlike Drones which require no risk to be taken by the pilots, just a bit of cash, and therefore have sold in the billions making them a genuine target for governments around the world to create heavy handed legislation, and demonise drone pilots. The response I get flying low along the beach in my PPG armed with my massive resolution Nikon D800 and 300mm lens compared to the response I get flying over the same beach with my Phantom 4 Pro is laughable. One takes wide angle pictures where you can just make out that there are people on the beach, whereas the other can zoom in to a sunburnt belly button. They wave and smile at the PPG and confront and get angry at me for flying the drone. Programmed by the self-serving bureaucrats they'll never meet. Rant over. Dan
    9 points
  3. Some year back I managed to fly into an ATZ Southend airport was subsequently shut down for two hours. So basically I took off with map in hand no glasses and managed to turn up and follow the wrong river and infringed the Southend airspace. Kinda knew how wrong I’d in fact got it when they were waving at me from the control tower. Anyways I landed got in phone and said it was me they were very pleased I had called and advised that they would have to contact CAA. A week later a CAA man called me and we had a lengthy conversation and he then said it would have to go to their enforcement team their police but again a nice polite informative conversation both ways. A few days later a had a phone call and a meeting was set up at my home with their policeman. We had about a three out meeting I showed him my gear and we spoke about the infringement at length looked at maps of the area and his recommendations were that I spoke with Southend ATC and a stern warning not to fly over the upcoming Olyimpics as he predicted I wouldn’t survive. So another week passed and was then invited to Southend ATC for a meeting with the manager we were shown around ATC and had a good chat about what we do. We then agreed that we would call ATC everytime we fly so that they would be aware of us and direct air traffic to be on look out. This work well so well in fact when Southend extended its ATZ which took in our field we were invited back for another meeting to discuss a way that we could continue using our field a fly. An agreement was drawn up with CAA approval which we sign every year and it’s working well. None of this would have been possible if a, I didn’t own up b, talk and listen c, by new glasses. My point I’m trying to make is yes we are all annoyed at what’s happened and I’m sure the culprit is equally annoyed at what his actions have caused but hanging them out to dry is not really the best action, but rather educate and talk (& listen) to all involved maybe the culprit would be more likely to own up if he she knew the outcome would be good rather than a punishment. Just saying from experience Neilzy
    9 points
  4. We handed Connor's van over to him on the weekend. Here's a video of the day.
    9 points
  5. Here's a video of my first cross country flight from a field near my home to Membury taking in some local sights.
    9 points
  6. A Massive thanks to those who supplied footage to help with this video @Tomfisher @rigger @tatumdale And of course, an un-measurable amount of thanks to all those who were there!!! (87 pilots signed in and flying!) thanks for being safe! The only person to visit A&E during this weekend was someone who's baby pushed a rice cake into his eye!! Please enjoy, share, and come to the next one!
    9 points
  7. i knew of this and had forgotten so all TWATS trying to convince the rest of us by walking across the road to fly and what harm are they doing:- In response to the questions raised about can we/should we fly I’d like to offer this. Last year an unnamed pilot enjoyed a perfectly legal flight. During this flight he completed a controlled landing in an open space completely without incident. Concerned members of the public saw this and unknowingly thought the pilot had crashed as he went out of sight behind terrain and called it on to 999, with the best intentions in the world. Due to the nature of the call police fire and ambulance attended the scene in numbers. Luckily one of the first responders flew ppg and after speaking with the witnesses was able to scale down the response somewhat. Despite this the area still had to be searched, just in case, with and ambulance was on standby. There being no trace of the pilot, who was probably at home enjoying a cuppa after a lovely flight, the police helicopter had to attend and search the area again from the air. All this took HOURS, even though someone in the know at the scene knew it was probably pointless. Still it had to be done just in case the person had been injured and lay somewhere out of sight. So think of the cost, 8 police officers, two ambulances and crew, two fire engines and crew, a bloody helicopter and crew, plus all the support staff involved in getting those resources on scene. The pilot was not traced, and did nothing wrong, wasn’t irresponsible or flying dangerously, and more than likely completely unaware of the cost in time money and resources expended due to his flight, again legal and blameless. And kept to a minimum due to a ppg pilot being involved. This ISNT an isolated incident, there have been several, all with no injury involved. Given the rules, which are now enforceable due to new legislation, do not allow us to fly. And a real life example of how a safe legal flight can hit all emergency services hard. Do we really need to be debating if we could fly by claiming it’s exercise, or I have my own field, or it’s not fair someone’s cycling, horse riding etc. Or DIY is more dangerous etc. No what should be happening is people saying yes it’s shit given the weather and desire to fly, but we’re doing our bit to beat this and backing the nation by not even risking the possibility of a strain on resources. Not only that if your stopped and challenged by a police officer out risking infection, whilst your flouting the rules for a jolly. They will no doubt and quite likely impose the highest penalty they can cause your clearly taking the piss. I hope this just makes it clear that you don’t have to get hurt or end up in hospital to drain resources. Come on pull together, stay safe and stay home, get your exercise on the ground and get in better shape for when we can fly, maybe with easier take offs due to a few less pounds carried. Thanks all. Your honestly know what the true responce to you justifiying why you think your doing NO harm going for a short flight.
    8 points
  8. Hi All - I have just had confirmation, that of this coming weekend, Axa are returning their PPG insurance to UK PPG pilots and residents. I have just been speaking to Sepp Himberger on this matter. URL and link: www.flugschulen.at/axa Cheers, Alex
    8 points
  9. G'day Guy's. Here's my design for my new dudek universal 1.1. what do u recon? I'm getting printedwings.com to print it.
    8 points
  10. Hi Bidochon. Early in my Paramotor career I had been flying with a large reserve that I had taken from a powered paraglider trike. It was a Metamorfosi conar 20. It was a large heavy bulk of a reserve weighing 5kg. In 2006 I entered a competition in France called Le-Raid which is a race across France. I spent time with the Belgian Paramotor team, none of which at that time carried reserves. Coming back from France I was seriously debating not flying with a reserve as I felt that by flying conservatively and safely I would avoid the need for a reserve. I was probably 1 or 2 flights away from taking my reserve off for good. Then on 18.08 2006 I took off from a stubble field and was climbing out to about 800ft AGL when for no apparent reason my wing started turning left, this quickly increased and the left side of the wing collapsed. I attempted to pump it out with the right break which made things a whole lot worse. I was now in a fairly steep spin falling quickly with almost slack lines and horizontal to the wing. With my throttle in my dominant right hand I pulled the reserve with my non dominant left, paused for a moment before realising that I was in big trouble. I was spinning and couldn't see clearly but the green bit was getting closer very quickly. I tossed the reserve out, I then watched the reserve bundle go into the collapsed wing, not good. I braced myself for impact having nothing left to recover, then suddenly a swinging jerk followed instantly by impact into a hedge on my back. This happened so quickly I hadn't even switched my engine off, I braced and in doing so was at full throttle landing in the hedge prop first. When I climbed out of the wreckage I could see that the prop, and fuel tank had exploded, the reserve was neatly laid out next my wing. I was completely unhurt. The reserve must have deployed at the very last second, which without any doubt saved my life. Unknown to me someone had seen me come down and called 999. When I was walking back to my car both police and Ambulance turned up. This was handy as I knew the Paramedics, they took me back to my machine and then conveyed both myself and my machine back to my car. Needless to say I have a reserve on my machine and will always have one. It took me almost a year to get over that. I almost gave up flying. The reason for the collapse was a knot in the D lines which I failed to see. There was a slight turn in the wing which I ignored. Poor pre-flight and post take off checks was the cause. Hope this helps. Whitters XX
    8 points
  11. I've passed my paramotor exam 6 weeks ago, but I'm still a novice improving my skills day by day. So, as a "flying novice" I can give some advices to other novices : 1) pre-flight : don't hurry. I repeat, DON'T HURRY. Take ALL the time you need to check your hardware and the environment. DON'T go to fly if you are in a hurry. DON'T fly if the weather or your phisical condition is less than optimal. Prepare your check-list and ALWAYS do all the checks 2) take off : don't hesitate. This is a crucial thing. When you start inflating the wing the correct mind status is "NOW I WILL TAKE OFF" , and not "now I'll try to take off". Don't know how to explain it, but seems that the wing reads your mind.... if the wings understands that you are not sure you want to take off, it will not rise correctly.... Don't look at the wing, this will distract you. Look in front of you and learn to "feel" the wing status through the risers. Don't leave the risers too soon. Better to keep them a little bit more than leaving them too soon. The throttle is your best friend during the take off.... assuming that your engine is not too powerful for a beginner, as soon as the wing is vertical over you and you've left the risers controlling the wing with the brakes, squeeze that damn throttle with no scare. DON'T rise your legs to take off. The wing shall lift you when you're still running. My instructor was very firm on this point. He pretended to see all us learners go on running like dumbs in the air for some seconds still after the take off. 3) flight : as soon as your soles detach from the ground, you're officially flying. The first thought shall NOT be to sit down confortably in the harness, but to have the full control of the wing direction. You can sit down later, when you've reached a safe height. I know by experience that it is almost impossible not to be nervous while in flight as a novice. This is not too bad, since it helps to keep the attention level always high. With the time you will learn to turn the nervousism into relaxed attention. Remember to always turn your head in the steering direction before to start the steering, in order to check if the area is clear from other flying objects. Non only when you fly in groups, but always. When you fly over towns, woods or industrial areas the "safety cone" is crucial. Your only thought shall be "what shall I do if the engine fails?" Keep the maximum possible height and keep an eye on every spot where shall be possible to land. Remember that if your hardware is in perfect conditions, the checklist is ok, the weather conditions are ideal (a must when flying as a novice) and you're flying early in the morning or late in the afternoon (with minimum thermal activity) nothing shall go wrong, except for an engine failure, that is always possible. But will have no consequences if your safety cone includes a landing spot. If an engine failure occurs, don't panic. Check for a landing spot, try to understand the ground wind direction (flags, smoke spotted on the ground... if not possible presume the same wind direction of the takeoff), best glide speed (fully close the trims if you have released them) and simply go to land in that spot. If you stay calm, everything will be fine. Remember that an engine cannot fly without a wing, but a wing can fly without an engine, and be optimist. For the same reason as a novice you shall always fly in the open country, where's full of possible emergency landing spots, even if it shall mean to run several km. by car for to reach the flight location. Your flight will certainly be much more relaxed....believe me. I've tried to fly close to where I live, wich is a higly populated area, And I've been nervous as hell during the entire flight. 4) landing : as a novice I well know that usually the landing is the scariest part of the flight. It shouldn't, and you will learn it with some experience. At the beginning, in the final of the landing , the ground seems to be approaching fast, very fast, too fast.... and this is the reason of the most common mistake, i.e. to brake too soon and/or too much. Go to the first floor of a building, open the window and look to the ground. This is the correct height where you have to start to SLIGHTLY brake. And remember that the stronger the wind is, the higher effect the brakes will have. It once happened that during a landing with what i call a strong wind (12-15 km./h as a novice... ) I was at abt. half a meter from the ground, I applied full brake to stall and the wind rised me up again in the air. Apart from this, only training and experience will teach you how to correctly land in every condition.... and no shame in putting in count some ass or knee landings... The worst enemy for the beginner is the scare, like the worst enemy for the expert is the excess of confidence. The scare makes you hesitate, and hesitation is no good. Think that YOU CAN DO IT, since if you do it like it has been taught to you, everything will be fine. This all I can say as a novice...... no problem at all if some experienced PPG pilot will correct some of the points. And plese forgive my grammar, since I'm Italian...
    8 points
  12. Posting here rather than paramotor videos, as its mostly not a paramotor video.. stu
    7 points
  13. Last year, the UK's best helicopter CAA examiner and pilot died (RIP) in a crash with a fixed wing pilot who held public display licences and also an examiner for the CAA. Just because you can fly a little microlight, it does not make you a sky god. SW
    7 points
  14. Just thought i'd share this pic I took on Wedneday morning at 'silly o'clock'. Might look very manacing/dangerous..... but I've deliberately cropped the image to make it so. There was a distinct line of mist along a river, and i was safely flying over clear sky, and 'zoomed' to get the head of the turbine just poking through. GD
    7 points
  15. What a truly great weekend! Here's some of my helmet cam footage shoehorned into a vid.
    6 points
  16. It gives me a great amount of pleasure to be able to say that on Monday, a person was arrested and had all of there digital devices seized by the Cyber Crime unit This is of course in relation to the E-mails that were sent from my PMC account, the cancelled subscriptions, and so on.. That person now has the pleasure of a lovely long wait on bail (with restrictions ) until they have searched ALL of those devices. The current expected lead time for this is 6-9 months. So 6-9 months of not knowing what's going to happen and being on bail, to me sounds like a perfect result already! #TEAMPMC SW
    6 points
  17. Thanks to Geoff keeping an eagle eye on the weather in Cornwall, he spied a great couple of days on Saturday and Sunday. So a plan was hatched for a weekend away, a bit of a trek from the West Midlands. Was it worth it? Hell yes! Many thanks for the hospitality of Davidstow Flying Club, details here for visiting pilots: https://davidstowflyingclub.org/visiting-pilots2/ We traveled down on Friday morning, setting off just after 6:00 and had a good run for 1/3 of the way until 5th gear failed in the motorhome. It decided it just didn't want to play so we continued the journey in 4th gear at a slower pace . We arrived at Davidstow at about 11:30 and set up camp after checking in with John (the Chairman of the club) in the clubhouse. It turned out that we shouldn't really have camped where we did but we will know for next time. The crew: Friday afternoon and evening were blown out but the forecast for Saturday and Sunday was superb. The airfield is at 1000 feet above sea level with so much space around it with the coast within easy reach to the west and Bodmin moor to the east. Geoff and I had two flights on the Saturday morning, one at about 8:00 and the second at about 10:00. It was my first ever time coastal flying, plus cloud hopping, it was superb. We both had a third flight later but Geoff was so keen when he saw Tony in the air that he went before dinner whereas I waited until afterwards. We were joking on the radio that everything would have been eaten before Geoff got back. Once I had flown Saturday evening turned into a long one with much mirth and merriment, just like the best fly-ins. We all got up a bit later on the Sunday but the weather was even better, so this time we both flew inland over Bodmin moor. The views from 1800 feet were epic with both coastlines in view, plus it was really smooth above 800 feet. Unfortunately we had to land eventually for a brunch fry up. Here is a contented pilot in his element post flight: Geoff had to be back at work on Monday so we packed up and returned on Sunday afternoon, myself at a slower pace in 4th gear. Fantastic weekend.
    6 points
  18. The PMC summer fly-in might just have to become the 'End of Corona Fly-in' As it stands, we are still set for the original dates for this event and will only cancel the event if ordered to do so by the .Gov Obviously there is a good chance that this can / will happen. Our plan of action is: 1. Keep planning / arranging the current date. 2. Plan alternative (later in the year dates). Whatever happens, we will be having this event as soon as is legally allowed. Stay happy, stay safe and be the best version of yourself SW
    6 points
  19. My plane instructor gave me a piece of advice about landing that massively helped me and it applies to Paramotors too. It may help you too. When you flair try to focus on flying a couple of inches above the runway for AS LONG as possible. Shift your eyes up and don't look too close to your feet. The theory is that if you are focusing on landing your brain will try and make the landing happen quickly - you'll look close to your feet and the ground will be moving fast, this will add to the overload and you'll try and make it stop by landing at that moment and you'll be going too quick. If you slow everything down, shift your eyes towards the horizon, the ground will appear to move slower, you'll feel like you have more time and your depth perception will be a lot better. Then try and hold yourself 6-12 inches above the ground for as long as you possibly can - all a flair is, is a way of trading your airspeed for lift, eventually, the wing runs out of lift when the airspeed isn't high enough to maintain it. At this point, you should touchdown at a much more comfortable speed (and if you're close to the ground, nice and soft). Since your engine is off there is no way to add speed to the wing so inevitably you'll touch down when the airspeed can no longer sustain enough lift for your weight. In short: don't try and land, because it'll happen to quick - try to fly above the runway and you'll touchdown anyway (just slower). I hope this helps you, it definitely helped me get over the sensory overload when landing.
    6 points
  20. A massive merry Christmas to you all It's about this time of year that I like to remind you all that YOU are the people that make this club what it is You are the people that make the forum, and the events what they are and will continue to be and I thank you for it! I hope to see you all in 2019 at one of them. DATES FOR BORE CHASERS!!!! Bore chasers Spring 2019 dates are: April 19, 20, 21. Keep an eye on the site for the event page going live to get your RSVP sorted. Again, MERRY CHRISTMAS to everyone and heres to a stonking 2019!! SW
    6 points
  21. So the weather has been worse than normal but I have managed to get a few hours in. Really enjoying it! Links so far...
    6 points
  22. I don’t get why you have to shit over the post with inane comments about nitro’s Andy? It isn’t helpful and it kills the thread. There are a lot of members who don’t post and it’s hardly any wonder the response they get sometimes from apparently senior members. Can we drop the ego’s and discuss the pastime we love with a little more respect for each other maybe? The forum would surely benefit as would our knowledge of new tech. Not just the amazing zero torque from the nitro, which I think you covered at least three times...
    6 points
  23. It was absolute rubbish. Never going again. The people were just awful. There were no fireworks. These are just some of the phrases that weren’t written by me in a text I sent to the missus to tell her what a great time I was having at the 2018 PMC Summer Fly-in. Actually, that's not strictly true as the fireworks phrase did in fact get mentioned later … but more about that shortly. After my drive from the Brecon Beacons, I arrived Friday lunchtime expecting to find a relatively empty field. What I actually found was a campsite full of people who very much looked like they’d been there since the last fly-in, all happily getting on with fly-in life. I noticed the posh toilets had made a return, along with two porta-loos adjacent to the signing-in tent (which later also became the beer tent). The fire pit was in position awaiting darkness, ignition and an audience. It wouldn’t be long before the food truck and pizza wagon would both be set-up. Simon was nearby, all smiles and clearly enjoying one of his favourite things - organising fly-ins. Little Col was working hard, also making sure it all happened. There was still a lot of choice for pitching so I was honoured to pitch-up right next to the nicest guy in the universe, Dickie Welham, who was there with his family. Despite a lot of people already being on the site, more continued to arrive and I was very pleased to see Baz Root turn up quickly and also a guaranteed source of merriment, Lee Jackson. Lots of pitching and unpacking took place during the afternoon followed by fuelling and preflighting. And the sun beat down. Also on the scene was Connor Amantrading - I hadn’t seen him since we had his post-accident surprise get-together in the cold and wet of Membury Airfield, back in February. He was planning to be flying this weekend - and it wasn’t long before he did … and did again… and again … The launch field began to get busy and a lot of pilots were airborne for Friday evening. Richard Whitmarsh also arrived, but he had flown in brandishing his shiny new Microlight licence and very generously took people up for flights over the weekend. What a gentleman. Simon was telling everyone that he encountered about the fireworks - We all knew how much work (and cash, no doubt) had gone into preparing for this year’s fireworks display, but there was a hitch - Owing to the extreme lack of rainfall in recent months, the parched ground was a very high fire risk and unless we had some serious downpour before Saturday night then the fireworks would not be happening. We all hoped for a massive downpour followed by fabulous flying conditions, being the optimist that we are. As the light faded, the fire pit became the usual focus for a lot of people. Ironically, the firepit caused no fire problems at all, but rules is rules. We also had to enjoy (or endure) a comedian who had probably never played to a poorly lit corner of a field with an iffy sound system and a half-interested audience. His magic tricks didn’t work (I couldn’t work out whether they were supposed to or not) but the audience was good-natured and he finally finished and the music went on into the evening. Prior to the comedian, we had a short speech from George, the land owner. Earlier, there had been several instances of pilots flying over areas we had been asked not to and the neighbouring chicken farmer and some residents in the nearby village were not overly happy. George was very laid-back but asked us to refrain from flying before 8.00 am in the mornings, and to avoid certain areas. It was all more than reasonable and everyone seemed happy to oblige - after all, it was his land and without him we’d not have been able to fly from here at all. The following morning many of us awoke to the sound of two paramotors taking off at 6.00 am. So much for George’s polite request. Fortunately, the rest of the fly-in's pilots respected the 8.00am start time and a little before 8.00 the launch field started filling up. Being later, the air was a little more bumpy but the sky was soon full of paramotors, all heading off for some fun. Our very own marshal, Andy Stuart, who in real life keeps us safe in his work as a rozzer, reprised his role of the previous evening and donned his fluorescent jacket to make sure everyone taking off and landing was part of some controlled chaos. Jason Mead-Blandford, and even Connor (between his many stints in the sky) could be seen in high-vis and helping keep everyone safe and organised during the day. The usual friendly vibe was prevalent throughout and it was nice to see a lot of new faces at the fly-in; the word has clearly spread. As ever, there wasn’t a bad word uttered about the fly-in… other than about the early morning pair and the fact that one or two other pilots seemed to be unable to understand the rule regarding not flying on or above the active runway. With the usual arrangements for making it more than a bunch of pilots in a field, the food facilities were very good and popular, with Killins Kitchen providing the nosh … despite running out of chips on Saturday night! And Platinum Bars did a great trade in liquid refreshment throughout the weekend. As has been widely circulated on the internet, The Red Arrows came over on Saturday afternoon and gave a us a brief private display. Simon had registered a notam so the thoughtful Arrows ensured that during their trip to The Air Tattoo they came directly over us and gave us a burst of smoke. Then, almost unbelievably, after they passed over the field they formed into two arcs, which more than one spectator observed looked like they were forming the shape of two paramotor wings. I’m happy to believe that’s what they did . As usual, tandem flights were available to those who weren't pilots themselves, and there seemed to be an endless stream of people waiting for their turn. At my count there were three tandem pilots, with the majority of people being taken up by Clive Mason. Also of note was Lee Moss who, in an amazingly short timespan, has become a tandem pilot - and for his first flight without his trainer (Clive) he took best mate Danny Kellett up. The Yeeehaaa as they came overhead is still ringing in my ears! The weather held good and hot which ensured lots of summer holiday feel - and also lots of thermals. It also meant that the fireworks were definitely not going to happen. They would have been spectacular but the fact that they didn’t go ahead had no effect on the mood, especially as Saturday evening gave some great flying opportunities which everyone took advantage of. Sunday morning was another late start, owing to the 8.00 am imposed limit. But plenty got up in the air. Gradually the camp broke-up during the day and by mid-afternoon only a handful of people remained. It had been another great success for Simon and PMC with the usual mellow atmosphere, great facilities on a great site and, best of all, so many genuinely great people getting together. Special mention must be made to the set-up (and take-down) crew, including Colin Borland, Colin Baker, Gary Higson, Andy Stuart, Andria Stuart (set-up crew food) and Connor Amantrading. And not forgetting The Red Arrows. With a great weekend behind us, all eyes are now on the Severn Bore Fly-in.
    6 points
  24. Hi Dave, I'm just a few months ahead of you. See how my sport has gone. I flew paragliders (20 years ago), then family and kids stopped all my fun. Both kids now over 16, so I started up again but realised I lived too far from the hills. Two hour drive to find forecast not accurate, so drove back home again; you can only do this so many times! Something had to change, decided I should try with a motor, therefore take-off from flat field, YIPPEE. Took the short conversion course in Oct 2017 and then realised new kit would cost me about £9k. Decided that I would work some overtime and put the money aside for PPG. By April 2018 I had £3k saved, so spent almost £2k on a parajet Zenith polini 130 and almost £1k on a Paramania REVO2 reflex wing. You can get into the hobby cheaper, but to get half decent kit, I was advised to budget £3k minimum. I used my old helmet, boots, vario and found no-one uses 2m radio (144 MHz) but rather the 70cm band (350 MHz). So I met up with the local PPG's in the Worcester area and they called me up for my first flights. Usually evening flights when the thermals have switched off and the air is much more calm. As with paragliding, it is very weather dependent, I'm always watching the wind speed and direction, and I have been surprised how long a field you need to take off in. Obviously you need an area to run, but also the long slow climb out, they are not all fantastic climb outs !!!! Also no trees up wind that could cause rotor. I'm averaging a flight every week around work commitments and family events. The first few flights did take several aborted launches, but I'm happy to say I'm much more likely to get off first time now....unless it's nil wind. Power launches do work, but you have to put 100% trust in your wing and run for ever...... Unfortunately the money hasn't stopped spending, new radio, helmet, reserve (£440), towbar (£295), Thule bike carrier for conversion to PPG carrier, I still need a flight deck, kobo tablet, etc... So the overtime goes ever onwards. Yes, I'm having fun. As a paraglider pilot I hoped to take off from the flat, get high, cut the engine and thermal again. This doesn't really happen ! You tend to fly a smaller wing for speed, stability and ease of launch, the trade off is a worse glide, and the motor is heavy. With fuel another 30kg on your back. It's a different sport. But you fly over a BBQ at 600 feet, and everyone waves at you. You feel like James Bond and the "NUMBSKULLS" in your head are shouting at you to show off, throw over a few wing-overs, spiral dive, and kill yourself for their entertainment.... Take your time, settle in; keep at least 500 feet up, you are quieter and safer, room to throw a reserve! I have found if you keep between 500 and 1000 feet you are below cruising altitude for most small aircraft, and high enough not to upset the locals. It is difficult to find good launch areas, so give the farmer a bottle of wine occasionally, take off and leave the area, don't buzz his animals and neighbours. ENJOY
    6 points
  25. Well, what a spectacular end to the weekend i had this morning.. Decided to go for an early flight and took off at 7:15 landing some three hours and 80 miles later. Superb conditions. First on the `to-do` list was to climb to 10,000`. It was smooth up there and not too chilly, quite manageable. To be honest the view from 10K isn`t really that much different from 5/6k, and the effort to get there is something that i`ll not rush to do again, and with no cloud to look at it`s not that interesting... The beauty of PPG is that you can go from all the way up there one minute to skimming the ground the next.....or tree tops in this case; ...then some recently drilled large field chasing my own shadow; Next up, rapeseed is always good - so low you can smell it; There`s a local pilot i occasionally see in the air - `Nucleon Man` i call him, and i saw him again today. I never fly with anybody else so it`s really cool to see another PPG in the same piece of sky, and those older Nuc`s don`t half shift, don`t they? Stunning spring colour; I made the most of this weekends blindin` weather and it came just in time as it looks like it`ll be a few weeks before my next airborne adventure as i wait for the grass to be cut in my regular field. The one i used this w/e has still not been prepared for crops as yet (will start this week) - maize in May. I was hoping to make flying career 200-hour mark this weekend but didn`t quite make it, that`ll have to be crossed off on my next flight. I hope everyone else had as good a weekend in the skies as me, it`s been a very long day and is now time for a beer or two. Cheers, Hann.
    6 points
  26. In fairness, it should be pointed out that you will inevitably end up going to fly-ins and hanging out with paramotor pilots and talking bollocks. And drinking beer. And talking bollocks.
    6 points
  27. Another vid for you guys who may not have seen it... early January provided some perfect conditions to explore the Pembrokeshire coastline! I hope you enjoy the vid as much as we enjoyed the flying! It really was epic!
    6 points
  28. I guess this should be a caption competition Just thought I would put my thoughts about the Sena 10r here because we couldn't find this type of information out and thought it was good to maintain this. Why Bluetooth vs Radio: After all the reading, we decided that Bluetooth headsets gave us Voice Activated rather than Push to Talk (PTT). Personally I am on the fence with this because I have flown with PTT while learning with @admin (Simon W) and I found having to PTT was a pain. However the 2M (I'm assuming it was, @admin (Simon W) can correct me) was clearer. Why Sena vs cheaper models: We went back and forth with this. And I think it came down to two things. First, the cheapers models we found *possibly* only allowed two pilots. Now to be honest with you, there was some doubt whether some units could do more but without buying them, we couldn't be sure. Where as the Senas could do 4+. Second, the Sena RideConnect app. This app allows more people to connect and uses your phones 3/4G therefore mitigating the Bluetooth range issue. Why Sena 10r vs Sena 10S or others: Again this was a balance between price and features. The 10r was smaller, streamline (thinner) and less weight. Personally this isn't a massive issue for me but one none the less. The 20s allowed more pilots, 8 I believe. This was the only thing that made us think we need this one because *some* of the time we do fly with more than 4. However the majority of the time it will be 4 or fewer. AND if the RideConnect app works, then we would have this with the 10r. So we went with the cheaper 10r Fitting to the helmet: Now to be honest, Lee Moss @MOSS fitted my one. And the fact I have a Cycle helmet with Peltors. So the battery is fitted to the back. The wires are sunk into the polystyrene and the ear piece is in the Peltors. It didn't take him long and please contact him for any questions. Setting up: The instructions were/are terrible. The booklet that came with it assumed you had the motorcycle handlebar controller. And looked very generic e.g. we figured out that some of the instructions were actually for the 20S. First you have to pair with the phone. This is where the instructions were wrong. Once you turn the unit on (hold centre and + button) you wait for the voice to say Hello. Then hold the centre button for more than 5 seconds until it says *Intercom* pairing. Then press the + button. She should say *Phone* pairing. Then on your phone the Sena should appear in your Bluetooth list. Once it's paired. Download the Sena app which will connect and update the device to the latest firmware. The app also provides the latest instructions however as I said before, they are wrong in some areas. As we try things out I will update this post. Now onto pairing with other Senas. One thing they don't tell you, or at least we couldn't find, is that the order in which you pair with other devices will store in the Sena as that number. E.g. I paired with Russell and he is friend number 1 on my Sena. Then with Barry, he's number 2 and so on. When using Bluetooth there does seem to be a master slave configuration. So I start by pressing the + and - button together to start group pairing. Then the others press the + button to join. There is a significant delay of sometimes a minute. Then all of a sudden we can hear and talk. The RideConnect app is more simple. I started it and it gives a 4 digit code. Which the others enter to join. We have also tried this while we are at home / driving and it works. I am informed that Russells daughter thought he looked great driving the car with his flying helmet on talking to me.... poor girl. The quality of sound in both cases were good. In the air: On this particular day, only two of us were able to fly and that's all we have managed to test while flying. We ran out of time to be honest. We flew using Bluetooth and it worked well. However once it got out of range and we lost connection. We restored this by flying close and I started again and it was fine. We didn't try the RideConnect app in flight. That's for next time. The quality of sound while flying was good. However at times when the engine was loud and the wind was fast past the MIC, we had to ask each other to repeat. I'm reading up on this and thinking theres some things we might be able to do with the MIC but thats not for this thread yet. Things for the next flight: More than 2 pilots; try Bluetooth and then RideConnect in flight to compare; Anything anyone wants us to if you leave a post here. Happy to try. Update 27th September 2017 - Three of us went flying with the Bluetooth enabled. We had already paired before so, following the instructions I turned on my Sena, held the + and - buttons together until I heard "Group Intercom". Then I told the other two guys to do the same and within a few seconds, we could all hear each other well. We all took off and we could all speak and hear each other. However, after a short while I lost connection to one of the Pilots who flew quite high. We are not sure what the distance was but we are not convinced it was over the advertised 900 metres. Furthermore into the flight I lost the remaining pilot and this time I was convinced we were within this range. We flew back to within I guess 500 metres, I pressed the + and - buttons and then I could hear the second pilot. We never regained the third pilots voice. So not a great report for using Bluetooth with three pilots. I think if we all flew close, it would be OK. Next to try is the RideConnect app which uses the phones 3/4G instead of Bluetooth. Cheers Danny
    6 points
  29. So I give away my alias but the subject matter is too important...
    6 points
  30. All, Assuming top notch service, realistic pricing, and fast turnaround... Please hit the thumbs up, if you would consider having your paramotor's maintenance / service issues repaired by our new team / small business. It consists of qualified mechanics, and a CAA certified welder and electrician and all work will be sent back with a guarantee. All work will be carried out either at Membury Airfields military service hanger or at the main workshop which is owned by a locally renowned to be awesome mechanic. Things we will be able to do include but are not limited too: 1. Motor not starting or running correctly 2. Pre / Post purchase inspection's 3. General service, inspection and thorough de-gunge (PMC service book and stamp issued during first service for your records) This will of course increase the saleability of your Paramotor when the time comes. 4. Welding of alloy, steal, & Titanium (CAA certified) 5. Custom work such as: fit this engine to this frame please, Trike modifications, builds. 6. Tuning / tweaking 7. Netting repairs 8. Prop balancing / repair* 9. Harness modifications* 10. Paint and Powder coat 11. I think you get the idea A reply would be great, but if you like this idea and feel as though it would be a service that you would use a thumbs up would be cool Every member of the team is an active pilot. Full members will enjoy a discount of course Many Thanks SW
    6 points
  31. My plan was to spend a little more time on this, but I just could not wait to get it out there!! Thanks soooo very much to everyone who was there! What an amazing vibe and thoroughly enjoyable weekend. SW
    6 points
  32. Had a couple of flights since my last update. Most notable was that I went with my partner in a camper van and spent 2 weeks driving the NC500 in Scotland. took my paramotor kit with me hoping to get a couple of flights in but that was a bit optimistic. However when I was at the very North West of Scotland, Durness, I got a short flight when there was a window of opportunity. We were camped at Sango Sands campsite which is at the top of the cliffs and the wind dropped.Forecast showed a flyable wind for a while - bearing in mind the location is near mountains so I was being careful about wind strength and direction. So, with something like 6-8mph inshore wind, I took my wing to a clifftop field next door to see how it felt. The wind was coming in nicely off the sea with an easy reverse launch acheivable. So I went and got my motor and got ready. I was a bit apprehensive being on the top of a cliff and relatively close to mountains. I set my wing up as far back as I could giving me room to get up OK especially with reverse. Deep breath, wing up, turn, run. Up I went and turned left before I went over the cliff edge which may have freaked me out I only got half hour as the wind picked up a bit and I was still wary of the mountain turbulence. But oh what a view! Simply amazing! A Bit disappointed I didn't get more flying time. I flew over the campsite and around the coast a bit just staying local and up to around 2500ft. When I felt the wind pick up and change direction a bit I came down happy that I'd got up even if it was only a short one. Easy approach and landing on my feet in a football field behind the launch field. (I could have taken off here but it was closer to houses and didn't want to annoy anyone) I've got some video footage but haven't had time to edit it. Ill add it to this thread later. FOr now here's a couple of frames from the GoPro. Happy times
    5 points
  33. sunny, thermal and about 10-12mph ground wind today. And after cleaning the van, I thought I'd check BHPA site and found I could fly again. Last flight January before the knee op. 3 months since knee op, which is early, but physio says I'm at the stage most folk are after 6 months, so feck it - I went for a wee 20 min flight today just to get back in the air. I only had 2.5 liters of fuel, and it was bumpy and thermal as buggery, but it was just good to get back up in the air frankly. I visibility of about 60 miles so nice views (as nice as they get in billiard table suffolk anyhoo), and thermals have never bothered me much. Surprised not more folk commenting about flights - I was a bit worried I'd read it wrong so checked BHPA again to be sure - and I'm sure was all allowed. The fact the skies were full of GA was also a give away - never seen so many wee planes around here than today. Anyhoo - got up, got down, landed on my feet, no issues with knee. So all in all, I call that a win. Looks like some better weather over the week, so might have another go now I've got some more fuel, etc. stu
    5 points
  34. My last flight before returning to the UK tomorrow. On the beach 26 deg, at 5500 feet - warmer! This was the first time I have made it over the top of Reales mountain. Because it is a stand-alone mountain, whichever way the wind blows it is very turbulent around most of the mountain! Today, 7 mph, blowing with me as I climbed. I followed the the largest ridge on the way up, gaining lots of extra lift. Above the top, engine off and just kept climbing. The mountain is 4800 and I was taken up to 5500 by it. Took 25 minutes of engine off back to the beach, where I was still at 2100 feet. Two photos on the way up and 3 from the top.
    5 points
  35. Find out how a Japanese karaoke machine manufacturer, an old dairy barn and the Clarks shoe company, combined with the vision and hard graft of one man, led to the world’s leading paramotor manufacturer - Parajet. What comes to mind when you think of Parajet? Smart designs? - Yes Gorgeous looks? - Certainly Superb build quality? - Without a doubt Reliability? - Absolutely Great flying dynamics? - The best Comfort? - Of course A long list - with one big overlying quality - customer service. I have to confess that I learned to fly on an old Pap, but the day I saw the original Volution1 I was immediately smitten with its stunning looks; there really was nothing comparable - and it had electric start! I just had to own it, so bought one immediately. After I ploughed it into the side of a hill following some very poor judgement, I discovered that overlying and most important aspect of owning any paramotor - customer service! Someone at Parajet was immediately available on the end of the phone and parts were sent out by next day delivery. When that wasn’t enough to fix my bent machine, there was an immediate offer of same-day service, meaning I could take the machine to the factory and have them drop everything to help me out. Plus not forgetting the message from the MD on a Sunday morning at 9.00 am, asking how he could help. You don’t get this level of service with any other company in any sector that I’ve experienced - but you do with Parajet. And that is why I have been a loyal customer for so many years - and will continue to be so. And I’m not alone. I have met many others who have similar experiences to tell - you only have to take a peek online to discover the immensity of the reputation Parajet has for looking after its customers. I imagine that most of us have only a little knowledge of the history of Parajet as a company, and those behind it. I decided I wanted to know more and to hear it from the horse’s mouth - which is why I met up with Gilo Cardozo, someone who is responsible for creating a point in time from which much of today’s fabulous advances in paramotor design have emanated. Whenever I've met Gilo in the past, he always struck me as the perfect person for moving paramotoring into the future - he constantly overflows with energy and passion for the sport and openly considers himself very lucky to have found something that he loves so much. As a schoolboy, Gilo was inventing and building little vertical take-off aircraft, and as soon as he discovered paramotors he realised that this was his perfect stepping-stone into the world of aviation and his dreams. It was a swelteringly hot day in mid-June when we met up, and it was a relief to sit down with Gilo in an air conditioned office and have the gaps in my knowledge, along with a lot of new stories, relayed from the company founder - who I’d humbly suggest also has a career as a raconteur awaiting, should he ever fancy a change. -------------------------------- I asked Gilo how it all came about at the very beginning. “I started Parajet when I was about 19 years old,” he began. “I left school and got into making portable cocktail bars for a company in London whilst simultaneously developing a product called Laddermax. Laddermax was a DiY product which you put onto ladders and which separated you from the wall. If you use ladders a lot it’s a really useful tool, and I sold thousands of them. “A friend of mine came up with the idea - I was still at school at the time and he was about 40 - he knew I was good at making stuff but he didn’t know how to make anything himself. He had been up a ladder one day, painting a window frame, and he’d thought to himself, ‘This is rubbish, I need a gadget!’ “So he came to me, an old friend of the family, and I told him that I’d knock it up in my workshop. So, during my A-levels I was making prototypes for this gadget, and I ended up leaving school early to crack-on and spend my time building this thing. I was aged between 17 and 18, then started getting contracts in for portable cocktail bars, an idea another friend of mine had come up with. He wanted to start making these for a company in London.” So Gilo also began making very smart portable cocktail bars out of aerospace grade aluminium. Gilo continued, “They were really very high-end looking pieces of equipment, with inlaid marketry all over them in aluminium and brass. They folded into a flat-pack arrangement and basically were sent off flat-packed to parties in cities all over the world. Once they had arrived, they folded out into stunning cocktail bars.” While all this was happening, Gilo had discovered paramotoring. “I got into paramotoring because when I was 15 I saw a tiny picture in a physics magazine of a guy with a fan strapped to his back, although it didn’t really make sense to me at the time as there was clearly no wing. “So I started looking into it. This was before the internet properly existed, but eventually I discovered that this paramotor thing needed a paraglider to fly. So, while these cocktail bars and the DiY ladder devices were going on, I was also getting very excited about paramotoring. But I couldn’t afford one as I was putting money into these other projects and couldn’t just go out and buy a paramotor.” Around this time, Gilo came across a guy who was teaching people to fly, called David O’Donnell, and he was in need of long range fuel tanks for a very popular Japanese paramotor called the DK Whisper. David asked Gilo whether he could make them. Gilo confirmed that he could. “So I went ahead and made vacuum forming tools to make a special polypropylene 12 litre fuel tank for a machine which normally had a 6 litre fuel tank. And I started selling quite a lot of them to David - they were about £150 each because they were all hand-made on my vacuum forming machine, which I was borrowing from my brother at the time. He was making vacuum formed garden products, so I would take his stuff off in the evening and put my stuff on and vacuum form my fuel tanks during the night, then get it all set up so he could carry on with making his products by the time morning arrived. “So I was selling quite a lot of these tanks, but as manufacturing was so labour-intensive I decided I should look into making them rotationally moulded instead. I found a company in the south-west called Wydale Plastics and they could see what I wanted to do - but it was going to be expensive, at about £15,000, to make a special tool which could bang them out for about £15 each. I thought this was what I needed because I was making so many of them and sending them out all over the world." At this time, DK Whisper were selling thousands of paramotors and were regarded as the best, with their electric start, specially developed engines for paramotors, etc. Gilo realised that as there were were so many DK Whispers in the world, if he could make these tanks on a large scale then he could make a good profit. Gilo remembers thinking, “As long as the Laddermax thing was going along okay and the cocktail bars were ticking over, although they weren’t making much money yet and were really labour-intensive, then I could do this.” But financing the expensive tool for the fuel tanks needed to be addressed. Gilo visited Wydale Plastics in Devon and showed them one of his existing fuel tanks. They confirmed they could make a rotationally moulded version. Recalling that visit, Gilo said, “I explained that I couldn’t really afford the tool but suggested that if I came in and worked in their workshop with one of their guys, he could just prompt me in the right direction and I could make the tool. “So I managed to do it for £500 instead of £15,000 because I put my own time into it. I made this really cool steel tool, it was fully functional, split apart and was perfect for what I needed. Because I was young and only looked about fifteen, they were very helpful. “Nowadays, if I saw a really young guy coming into my workshop extremely keen to do something, I’d want to help him. I didn’t realise it at the time but looking back now I can see they were equally happy to help me - I merely thought I’d been very lucky.” So Gilo started making the rotationally moulded tanks and it worked very well, selling hundreds more of them. These sales now ensured that he could save enough money to buy himself a paramotor, but his first one turned out to be not very good. “I got one from Scobyjet in Poole, who were the first paramotor manufacturer in the UK. It had a twin-cylinder boxer engine which was a bit old fashioned and unreliable and I only got to fly it once - so I saved up a bit more and got a practically new DK Whisper from David O’Donnell - and that’s when I got crazy about paramotoring. I was 19 and thought that this was just brilliant and that everyone should be doing it - it was such incredibly good fun.” This was about 2001. The Laddermax and cocktail bars were both separate companies which Gilo shared with other people. But making the fuel tanks was his first solo venture, as Gilo Industries. Gilo recalled, “Gilo Industries, my first company, made the fuel tanks and they had the name Gilo Industries written on them, which I thought was quite a fun name especially because it was a bit ridiculous; there were no industries at all, there was just me in my shed, basically. “However, I had this vision of a big industry, so I could see where I wanted it to be going. And making plastic fuel tanks was somewhere to start from.” However, shortly after Gilo got into paramotoring DK Whisper went out of production. DK (Daiichi Kosho) was a multibillion dollar corporation, and were the largest manufacturer of karaoke machines in the world. They had a division called Sky Leisure which had been making the DK Whisper - they had done it properly because they had access to lots of funds. The president of the company in Japan had loved paragliding and paramotoring and this was the reason he created Sky Leisure. Gilo: “I had learned a lot about the DK machines through flying them and through making fuel tanks for them. As I knew the machine so well, I knew I had to go over to Japan as soon as I heard they were stopping production. The president was leaving the company and the new president who was coming in had no interest in Sky Leisure at all. The old president had driven everything through his own passion for paramotoring but the new guy was quite the opposite and thought that it was a bit of a liability, so got rid of it. He literally just cut it off.” DK had a fully designed paramotor, along with an engine designed from scratch for it, and so Gilo went to Japan to see whether he could arrange for all those parts to be shipped over to England directly from the original suppliers. That included engine casings, cages, harnesses, and every other component possible. He didn’t succeed in getting every part of the DK Whisper but did manage to form a deal with the chief designer, who by now had left DK and was working on his own. He knew the network of suppliers from his time working with the company. Having established a deal with the Japanese designer from DK, Gilo also needed to find a deal with a travel company to get him to Japan as he was still rather short of cash, and £1000 for a ticket to Japan wasn’t an easy thing to find. But, in his usual manner, Gilo did just that and got his deal and a trip to the Far East. Gilo: “I got about 80 percent of the parts and, despite it being an immense undertaking and just doing it on my own, it was just such an exciting prospect. I knew I could take on a completely ready-made design with a full supply chain and I could make this paramotor again and launch the new DK Whisper from Britain as a new company. “And I called this new company Parajet.” I asked Gilo where the name came from. “About a year previously, I’d registered a patent (pending) for a jet-powered paramotor. It was a twin gas turbine that I wanted to be able to pack-up into a really small bag, which would give fifteen minutes of flying time to do really radical stunts and the like. I still have all the sketches from about 2001 when this was all happening. For the patent office I’d needed a name and so called it the Parajet. “By this time the internet had kicked off and was well underway, and I clicked on parajet.com and nothing came up. So I snapped up the domain - and that swung it for me. I decided there and then that this company would be called Parajet and it would be a part of Gilo Industries. As it happened, Parajet grew and Gilo Industries was more of a sideline, so Parajet became the main company that everyone knew. “So I got to Japan, met the guy out there, having spent six months prior to that trying to get the parts organised from the UK ... but I had a lot of issues trying to organise everything. For example, Tohatsu were subcontracted by DK to manufacture the engine for their paramotor, with all the casings, integration for the reduction drive, the starter motor, etc. It was a properly developed paramotor engine and Tohatsu, who already mass produced engines for all sorts of things such as generators, outboards, etc. was a very well known brand. “But I couldn’t get what I wanted over the phone or by email, which is why I went out there, met up with the designer from DK, and basically set up a deal whereby he would help me get all these parts. I eventually went back to the UK with lots of boxes full of bits - cylinders and all the parts I’d been trying to get hold of. And then I remade all the other parts in my old barn down in Motcombe. Gilo had made a wooden jig for the paramotor cage and chassis and asked a friend, who was in a workshop nearby and had an aluminium welder, to weld them up during the evenings. Over time Gilo managed to get enough money together to buy his own aluminium welder but the first few hundred paramotors were all made by taking them to his friend down the road. The resulting paramotors were as good as the original thing, just having been made on wooden jigs and hand-bent on an aluminium bender. “So, I tried to replicate the DK Whisper as accurately as I could and it actually worked really well - there was no difference between the original DK Whisper and the machine I was now making by hand in the UK. However, after a while it became clear that the product supply chain was just too limited; when importing engines to the UK from Japan the exchange rate was very poor and it was not a good time to be buying products from that country - so Gilo decided he needed to make a new engine. Gilo grinned, “And then I hit gold! “I found a small company in Salisbury called Lamb Engineering, run by a brilliant engineer called Larry who was about 40 years old. He owned this company making components for lots of other companies and he had a range of milling machines, lathes and all sorts of equipment which I didn’t have at that time, including CNC machines. “So I visited his workshop one day and showed him my paramotor after he’d just finished a stunning custom motorbike. That motorbike pet project was literally just completed and he was ready for another one - and he was the kind of guy who just loved projects. “Larry had never seen a paramotor before and he was incredibly excited by it. I was telling him that I wanted to do this and I wanted to do that ... and before I knew it we’d started working on new crankcases and crankshafts and before long had created a new engine from scratch. “It was a single cylinder engine - we had managed to get a cylinder head from a 180cc Malossi, a component which was intended as an expansion kit to increase a 125cc engine to 180cc, and was available off the shelf for about £180. Added to our own crankshaft, crankcase and other components, all made with Larry's CNC milling machines, we were well underway to making our own engine. But, as usual for small any new business, money and cashflow was a stumbling block, so Gilo came up with a bold proposal. I made a deal with him - I said, 'I will pay you for these parts two months later than you supply them to me. So you make as many as you can, and I will buy as many as I can, just give me the sixty days credit'. This ensured that I didn’t have to fork out loads of money upfront. “So this was a way for me to obtain engines, by far the most expensive of all paramotor components. I could make the chassis, the cages and other parts, but buying an engine from another company was always going to be at least £1000 for each one, so it wouldn’t have worked out when trying to build a decent volume of paramotors whilst having to fork out thousands, that I didn’t have, for engines.” So now it made financial sense and for the next three years Parajet built lots of these machines, which replaced the SkyDoo (the machine with the Japanese engine in it), and which became the Parajet GTX, the paramotor with their own engine. Gilo: “It actually took us about two years to get that GTX engine good, and probably nearer three years to get it seriously good - and then it was super-reliable and a nice piece of kit. And that engine eventually became the XT - although the XT actually wasn’t as good as the GTX! “The XT engine was an evolution of the GTX but it was lighter, therefore some of the reliability and smoothness had been taken out of it. It was a re-engineered version, which I’d handed to one of our engineers to evolve it to the next generation. But a lot of mistakes were made in the process. At that time I was busy setting up Rotron and other projects, so I wasn’t completely hands-on with it as much I would have liked, and some of the things I’d learned the first time around with the GTX, about what not to do, my engineers actually did - But all with good intentions. Things like reducing the weight of the crankshaft, putting smaller bearings in, and reducing the weight of the flywheel - all this actually ended up with a bit of a vibrating motor, whereas the GTX motor had been a very smooth engine, one which started reliably and had become very good. But the XT engine started breaking exhausts and such because of the vibration, although it was still a successful engine which did its job and expanded the Parajet brand. Gilo had explained where the XT engine came from, but I wanted to know how the radical frame came about, the frame which instantly stood Parajet out from the crowd. Gilo: “Going back to the GTX engine, it went into the frame I was making in my workshop, which was based on the original DK Whisper - so it looked just like the DK Whisper with a different engine in it. Our engine. “But then I decided that I didn’t like the DK Whisper frame either - everyone had started talking about low hang points and stuff like that, so I thought we had better explore this new low hang point concept, and while we're doing that let’s look into designing a whole new chassis and cage. “I’d always thought, ‘Why aren’t we using aerofoil sections?’ So I found a company called Seldom Masts who made aerofoil cross-pieces for the masts on sailing boats, and they had two different sizes of extrusion. So I began making the Volution frame from these. “The new engine, the GTX, went into the new chassis made from aerofoil sections and that is what became the Volution paramotor, and which was made in three versions - The Macro (with a 126cm prop), the Compact (with a 95cm prop) and the Micro (with an 80cm prop). “It was great as I didn’t have to extrude anything myself, I just found the company and they did it for me, because they had the tools. So that saved me quite a lot of money upfront. “So the Volution had arrived, which was the same year as I got married, 2007. I was designing it well into 2006 and it was launched officially in 2007. Which was also at the same time as I was doing the Everest project.” Whilst listening to Gilo, I was intrigued by the immensity that the change in paramotor chassis design must have had, being so radical and potentially leaving other paramotor designs looking like something of an anachronism. Gilo: “I looked at the DK Whisper style frame with the GTX engine and decided it all looked a bit clunky and old fashioned and decided I needed to make this thing look super-cool. Which is why I so wanted to try and use aerofoil sections and good design. “I made full steel jigs for this new machine, rather than wooden ones, and everything about it I was trying to design for slicker manufacturing. Things like getting rid of the netting, which some people didn’t like; I personally loved it because it made it so much quicker to manufacture them - stringing up nets and cages took hours, plus I thought it looked cool. It certainly looked very different. And it was safe enough, there were no accidents that I came across because of it. That was the real drive behind creating the Volution, and I started selling loads of them. “Around that time I met up with Bear Grylls and taught him how to fly on a Volution. We kicked off this plan to do the Everest project, which was great publicity for both of us. At that time I really wanted to get someone with a big name with whom to associate the brand. Bear was building his name back then and you could see that he was really going to go places, we got on really well and he became a great friend. He loves mucking about on paramotors - we even gave him his own brand eventually. “As time passed, at Parajet we decided that we needed to make different sized paramotors in the range; big ones and smaller ones, but interestingly the Micro was a bit of a flop. I thought everyone would want a tiny paramotor because it was so small and compact and you could break it down into a small car. It was a super little thing, in fact I still have one. The way it has gone in paramotoring is that everyone wants bigger and bigger machines, more powerful and fuel efficient, but the Micro wasn’t punchy enough for a lot of pilots, for quick take-offs and such." For the Everest project, Gilo developed a huge version of the Volution which had a new rotary engine for paramotors which would, incredibly, produce nearly 100 horsepower, was supercharged, with fuel injection and which was incredibly heavy - and this taught him a lot about rotary engines during the process. Gilo then realised that he should be using rotary engines in his paramotors. “So I found a company in Germany making small 294cc rotary engines for go karts and did a deal with them to convert them into paramotor engines. I bought the casings, the rotors, the shafts, all from this company in Germany - I thought this is great, they’re making all the hard bits now but I need to learn about this properly. Unfortunately, they started letting me down more and more, with poor quality stuff coming in. Things were breaking, which ended up with paramotors which had been shipped all over the world now coming back with seized engines and needing a new replacement engine each time. “I was trying to work out why they were seizing. It turned out they were getting too hot inside because the actual design wasn’t right. “So we decided that we needed to set up a new company to make these engines ourselves - the German company wasn’t supplying us with the quality we needed, so Rotron officially kicked-off making our own rotary engines. “We began with a whole new design to make them much better, and came up with a lot of other applications for these engines, but primarily it was for paramotoring - because I just love paramotoring. But also looking beyond that; UAVs, vertical take-off aircraft, motorbikes and all sorts of other things as well.” And that’s where Rotron has ultimately gone, making engines for a multitude of applications. And, during this process, paramotoring went down the list some way, because the money from bigger applications allowed the company to grow. This created the need for each company to be developing independently - Gilo Industries is the holding company, and within it there are the subsidiary companies Rotron and Parajet. And they are both companies in their own right with their own identities. Gilo: “You need people with completely different energies to manage these companies. Rotron has its own set of staff who work with their high-end clients, such as Boeing, to produce amazing products for various sectors and are completely focussed on making rotary engines. Parajet has very different clients and staff, it’s equally faced-paced but there’s a lot of fun and a different energy there. And they are completely focussed on making paramotors. I love both and am really proud of all our staff who make the companies what they are.” PREMISES, MACHINES AND STAFF I first discovered Parajet when they were in their old workshop in Mere. But prior to that they were in Motcombe in a small old dairy barn, which was about 40 feet x 20 feet and which Gilo had converted into a workshop - it had an old lathe and a milling machine which he’d managed to pick up over the years. Gilo was working mostly alone - he would work all day and then take all the bits he’d made, and his wooden jig, down to his friend Ian (who worked all day for another company) in Gilo’s little van. Ian would do an extra two hours every evening welding up paramotor frames and cages in a big workshop which belonged to someone else and which was used to make vacuum forming machines. Gilo: “So I’d prepare it all for Ian and bring it down fully populated in the jig, then he’d weld it and I’d take it home again. I paid about £80 for each cage to be welded. It was a pretty labour intensive way of doing things but it was the only way I could really afford it at the time, I couldn’t afford to sub-contract another company to do it all for me. “But it was the best way to get started. Eventually after eight months I managed to buy a welder and then he would come to me each evening and work in my tiny workshop after I’d prepared all of the parts for each machine during the day. “So I had what I needed but all the really complicated stuff like crankcases, etc. were being made by Lamb Engineering in Salisbury. So I’d assemble the engines and put them into the frames we were making and then ship them out from there. And I built probably 900 paramotors myself during this time, before anyone else was involved. I had a girl called Jenny who came to work making wiring harnesses and she did some assembly of netting on the cages. My girlfriend of the time also used to net up the cages, which was handy! "And I do look back on that as the good old days, where it was all done by hand for five years from an old barn down in Motcombe." Gilo then moved into the bigger workshop in Mere in 2005. And this is where the story of Parajet’s history takes an unexpected and fabulous turn. When he started making the Volution fuel tank, which was very curvy in several places and very complicated to manufacture, Gilo carved it out of foam and approached a company he’d heard did electroplating of plastics. Gilo: “I’d heard of them through the Wydale Plastics company who, when they saw my foam model, had said they couldn’t make a tool like that - it was far too complicated. But they knew a company who could do electroplating and they thought might be able to help. “So I contacted a company called Maple Precision Tooling, who were an offshoot of the Clarks shoe company. “Clarks Shoes had an amazing workshop for making all of their tooling, in the town of Street in Somerset. When Clarks took their manufacturing out of the UK to the Far East, they kept their machine shop and basically gave it to their employees, telling them to do what they wanted with the machinery. They got to keep their jobs and were encouraged to use their skills to find and supply other companies around the country. “So they had this enormous building filled to the ceiling with all sorts of great equipment, and I met them through asking them to do the electroplating of my foam fuel tank model - I’d prepared it so that it could have an electroconductive cover put over it. They dipped it in a tank in the same way they did for shoe moulds and electroplated the entire thing with about 6mm of nickel in three sections - which all came apart so you could polish the inside of it. So we created the shape in a high temperature metal (nickel) of the complex foam shape which I’d hand carved. And it worked really well.” This all happened in 2005, but soon news arrived from Maple Engineering that they were beginning to struggle and that Clarks were going to take down the factory. They were going to build a new housing estate in place of their workshop. The Maple Precision staff were going to be kicked out of their premises. Gilo: “When I heard about this, I told them that I had just found this large workshop in Mere, and that I didn’t need all of the space, and suggested that they move all of their equipment into there. I also suggested that they could make all of my paramotor parts for me in-house with their CNC machine shop. So that’s what they did; they literally shifted hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of kit to my workshop in Mere after I’d cleaned it up, painted the floor and made it as nice as I could. “I built a mezzanine for the upstairs, putting my Parajet assembly line on that upper floor and had the machine shop downstairs for making all the parts. And they also ended up making all of my complex pieces because Larry had got fed-up with making all these crankcases and other parts for me and was keen to get on with his next project - as he was really keen on making motorbikes. And it worked out very well. “It was good timing because that workshop looked very impressive - it had a lot of equipment in it. It was my workshop but I didn’t have to pay for any of the machines because they all belonged to Maple, who had been given them by Clarks in the first place. I had the complete run of their workshop - it was basically my workshop, even though I didn’t know how to use the machines - but the eight guys from Maple who were working there did. So the first Parajet staff were Maple Engineering staff who had been Clarks Shoes staff, although they were more than we actually needed - we only needed three or four guys for Parajet at the time, but they had their own contracts to do too - so everyone was happy. “Over time I started replacing their machinery with newer and better machinery, so eventually we had upgraded everything. But it had been a real leg-up. “At that time I was just kicking-off the Everest project plans, had just created the new workshop with all the equipment for free, and it looked like I’d done seriously well to the guys from GKN who came down with their big business hats on and saw this operation with all these guys wearing white Parajet coats building Parajet parts - they thought, 'Brilliant, this guy and his team can really make an engine that will get a paramotor over Everest', so it worked really well.” Gilo then used the whole set-up to raise money for his next project and also Rotron engines, because it looked like what is now was, a very professional company. Gilo: “So that was a key turning point, getting the Everest project underway and getting the guys from Clarks Shoes involved. “I look at big companies now and think back to what I struggled with when I was younger. One was credibility because I was very young and I didn’t have any money so I couldn’t really pay for anything, so I couldn’t really raise money very easily from other people - they didn’t want to give to a young guy with a whacky idea for a flying machine, it just didn’t look like it financially stacked-up. And I couldn’t talk the business lingo very well with them, do all the accounts and stuff - I was terrible at all that so I really just had to do it my own way. “ So Gilo just grafted his way through it all. But he loved it, and confesses to it not feeling like anything but mostly fun. He remembers it feeling like 80% of the time as really good fun, 20% of the time as really, really hard work. MUSEUM When I asked whether Gilo still has any of the original paramotors, I discovered that he does, and Parajet are actually putting a museum together at the moment. This will be installed into their new building, covering the entire history of Parajet, from the original DK Whisper copy, through the GTX version in the DK Whisper frame, then the new frame with the GTX engine, and then onto the Volution with the XT engine and onwards - right through to the latest machines including the v3, Zenith, Maverick and Falco trike. There will be a full story board with pictures and information so visitors will be able to see how it all evolved, with everything on display including the different sizes of machines with different propellers. A FEW FINAL THOUGHTS The future of paramotoring is very exciting - and, as you can probably imagine, Gilo has a vision which is way beyond where most of us are seeing right now. With new technologies, new composite materials, new manufacturing techniques, and perhaps best of all, designing and manufacturing everything in-house, the future Parajet machines are certainly going to be something incredible - If you think that Parajet is top of their game now, imagine where they will be in two years, five years or even ten years. The company's vision, motivation and energy will ensure that Parajet continues to produces paramotors to suit every current and future pilot - which means that from our perspective, as paramotor pilots, all we have to do is wait. And not for too long, I suspect. - Steve Thomas --------------------------------
    5 points
  36. The currently plan is this: We will continue to have the main summer event on the dates we always do BUT We will have another fly-in!! ( An extra one! ) as well after this one. I think that's a win win all round SW
    5 points
  37. Yes, I think everyone is in agreement. Please forgive me if this comes across the wrong way, I'm 100% definitely not a brand devoteé and have only owned a Parajet Macro V1 and a Bulldog. But when I was buying my second motor, 4 years ago, Clive Bunce of Bulldog fame showed me the cage design he'd opted for, and explained the reasons he had designed a fully closed net. He pointed out to me that the gaps in the netting, on pretty much all other paramotors, were 'an accident waiting to happen' (he really did say that to me). I remember him standing and demonstrating how a deep flare could put a badly routed throttle cable into a prop arc (if it were turning). Now, I'm really not trying to say everyone should have bought a Bulldog, but surely its a relatively easy fix to concoct a bridge to the netting gap on most setups. More importantly, it really wouldn't hurt for some of the manufacturers out there to come up with a retro solution to this too (due diligence). On a slightly different matter, I always route my throttle cable over my arm (never under). Geoff Soden taught me to do that, many moons ago, specifically to make life easy in the throttle were ever dropped - but also because of the dangers brought about by the throttle loop poking too far back! I do see a lot of people at flyins with the large loop under their throttle arm. Imagine if one of these hand/prop accidents happened whilst at height?!?!? I shudder at the thought. We all know there are many risks involved with what we're doing, but its a terrible shame that some great guys and good experienced pilots have been seriously injured in such innocuous circumstances. Hopefully people will learn, adjust kit, habits etc and we'll avoid any more nasty's.
    5 points
  38. Dynamic collapse with unforgiving altitude. It fits the description in the synth 2 manual, very quick and spontaneous re-inflation... but just a bit to close to the ground. Quick entry into a 360 spiral with power (fun), then off the throttle, hands up and then what looks like a forced exit with counter steering on left side. The engine rev up on the surge after the quick exit together with too much exit speed, so that would be the biggest pilot error in this situation, even if it's just a short push on the throttle. Then we have the left turn that unloads the side even more after exit, and collapse, if this also was counter torque, then it would be even worse. Hard left break pump after the collapse might have saved the situation with a close call, but probably not with the lack of altitude. Easy mistake when exiting maneuvers with high speed. Only assist exit if needed, don't force it. This is often described in manuals and on acro pages. Watch spiral dive exit videos on youtube to learn more and be a safer pilot. This is also a possible outcome when the timing and exit on wing-overs and asymmetrical spirals are wrong. Also mentioned in the synth 2 manual btw. As you see in the video it has to be done correct on low altitude since it's very unforgiving if done wrong. Simply don't do it if your not already very familiar with acro. Even if you are uninterested in acro flying, anyone will still benefit to read about it to get a solid understanding of the typical behavior a paraglider have in these situations. Thanks for sharing, and hope you recover well Connor, not many gets a second chance.
    5 points
  39. @cas_whitmore @DickieW @reactionjackson Please tag anyone else you recognise.
    5 points
  40. Turns out I'd lost a lot of camera footage (mostly of people around the campsite), but I'd just enough left to make a video. Oh and apologies, I missed the Bore itself!
    5 points
  41. I thought I would give the vlogging thing a try as I have just received my new Paramotor & I saw an opportunity to fill a gap in the UK regarding info on Paramotors & flying in general. It's a bit of a shakey start, I'm already finding out that it isn't as easy as it looks. I have got lots of ideas for improvements & ideas for more videos, including a mini 5 minute series of video's on things like how I transport the Paramotor. Mixing, storing & carrying fuel, etc. Happy to hear feedback on how to improve the videos & suggestions for anything else people want me to cover...
    5 points
  42. Every winter, new PPG pilots discover flying in typical UK winter temperatures and quickly begin the quest for a solution to fingers which can be so cold that the pain is unbearable. Most of this is all nicely forgotten about when the spring comes, until a reminder in the form of extreme altitude or another looming winter approaches. During my first PPG winter I experienced fingers which I could not make function, no matter how hard I tried. And I had experience of long diving decompression stops in icy waters. This was worse, in no small part because I had to fly and land my paramotor, not just hang around watching a depth gauge and timer. For my second winter I invested in some Gin Winter Alpine gloves. These were excellent gloves and did the trick for a while, although after 30 or 40 minutes things started getting very unpleasant again in the digit dept. I tried all the regularly suggested tricks, such as keeping your hands warm until the very last minute before launch, putting a heat pad on your wrists/in your glove somewhere. Nothing made any difference and merely added to the bulk which already accompanies cold flying days. Then about three years ago I swapped my Polini throttle for a Cameleon throttle, which I loved. However, for me, it meant that bulky gloves didn’t work with this new way of operating a throttle (the fabric of thick gloves bunched up too much when bending the throttle finger to use it properly) so a solution was urgently sought. Heated gloves were the obvious answer, but everything I tried was inevitably bulky to varying extents. I’ve always hated bulk in your hands when launching and flying - risers, throttle, and brake handles need some feel and control. I figured out that some of my winter hill walking kit was pretty good and realised that there was a glove version of my windproof, thin and well-insulated Montane Prism jacket (which is awesome and I also use for flying, even over the Alps at 9000 feet AGL - when all the other pilots were in full flying suits). The gloves certainly proved thin and low bulk enough to be nice to fly with and very warm. I also realised that a heated liner would fit in very nicely without adding much bulk. The cheapest usable option has always been the Blazewear X1 liners. They have a couple of battery options and come in at just under £100. I bought mine three years ago and put them to the test in the Brecon Beacons on a very cold morning over Pen y Fan. And everything changed; My fingers didn’t get that distracting background pain which swiftly builds into a very distracting agony - they just stayed ... comfortable. I had been expecting my hands to be warm and to be able to feel the heat, but generally that wasn’t the case. When it’s properly cold, you simply don’t get cold hands; they just feel normal. When it’s less cold, you can turn the heating setting down as you have three settings. This is easily adjusted with gloved hands by pressing the large button on the cuff, the light changes from green (lowest) to orange (mid-setting) to red (warmest). 7.4v, 1800mAh lithium polymer batteries (similar in size and shape to the old flat style mobile phone batteries) power the composite fibres within the glove fabric which provide good duration - I have never landed with the battery having run out. I am normally cold in other places after an hour or two, so that’s perfect. I have noticed that sometimes the heat setting has changed during flight (indicated by the fact that my hands felt slightly cooler) which turned out to have been caused by the button having been pressed accidentally. It took me a while to figure out how that could have happened but in the end I realised that it was most likely caused by pressing or rubbing my wrists against the risers at some point (the button is on the inside wrist area) so I now periodically cast a glance at my wrists to check that the chosen heat setting light is still illuminated. The gloves themselves are stretchy and at no point do you have any sensation of there being heating elements in them, it is very well concealed. The heating element threads run over the tops of the fingers and thumb and heat all the right places. The cuffs are nicely long and contain the battery packs and the power/settings button. The battery compartment is behind a small zip and to recharge the batteries you simply unplug them (no need to remove them from the glove) and plug in the charger connection. The X1 liners heat to a maximum temperature of 50 degrees C. and are hand washable (although I’ve never washed mine and they feel clean and don’t smell after three winters of use!). Obviously having the right sort of glove on top of the liners is important and essential to the success of the heated liner so, for me, the combination of the Montane Prism glove and the X1 liner is a winner. The Prism gloves are a little short in the wrist which means the X1’s heat setting switch and light are easily accessible when worn with them. They are a little 'slippery' though, although the latest version appears to have added a phone touchscreen friendly area to the finger tips. If you're looking for a solution to the flight-shortening annual issue of blue fingers, then take a look at the Blazewear X1 liners and an appropriate glove. https://www.blazewear.com/heated-gloves/x1-liners.html https://www.montane.co.uk/mens-c1/accessories-c26/gloves-c47/prism-glove-p39
    5 points
  43. Hello all. Here is what I consider to be an important note on wing selection for Paramotors. When I started flying 'paragliders' the wing options were simple. New pilots: super safe, super fun, stress free wing. (no one would have sold you anything other) without proof of skill level. Intermediate pilots: (maybe getting into XC comps) would start to look at a wing which required more 'pilot input for recovery' but only after testing one under the eye of the instructor. Advanced pilots: Basically you could not buy an advanced wing or an uncertified one. Some actual 'sky gods' were invited by manufacturers to use there uncertified wings and high end DHV 3 wings. This represented (at a guess) about half of one percent of the flying population at the time. As a result non of the dealers stocked or supplied such wings. It was left to the genuine hardcore few who had many many hours (better measured in months) of flying under there belts. It's hard to imagine I know but this was around 13 years ago when facebook, online shopping, and forums were not to be seen. ( As an aside, when I left the ARMY I was employed by a company called 'Smartgroups' which was set up by a Paragliding pilot as a way for pilots to connect, That company sold to Freeserve for £60 million later down the line because it was the very first of it's kind.... ) anyway... My point with that.. Online shopping was a new thing and people were scared of it. So what's changed? It's painful to say but the first thing I notice is that more people are getting hurt and dying in the last few years than in the last 13 at a scary rate. I don't think that this is just a 'numbers' thing like more people flying more people dying!! thats a BS thought process proven wrong by history. I think its an overall 'attitude' issue combined with the ability to go to an online shop, be sent an aircraft in the post with no hand over and no safety information after having never been asked "are you experienced enough for this wing?" is the problem here. People are thinking of wings like a pair of NIKE trainers... A new one comes out with a snazzy video and forget the target market (acro, slalom and so on that half a percent I mentioned ) but many of the current generation of paramotor pilots seems to be swaying towards owning the latest new hot pair of trainers even if there are pins in the sole. Online shops are going to literally 'kill' this sport in my opinion. I have worked in the industry for enough time to be able to have watched it happening. The scary thing is, it's happening more and more every single year. I guess my message is this.. NEW pilots: Stop buying online without advice from someone other than the seller. Best option, an instructor! Pilots: think before you opt for a sporty wing just to be 'in with the kids' and get a proper handover explanation from a real instructor not a web master. Ask yourself why you want it? Ask your wife, girlfriend, children, if they think it's wise. And know the added risk of owning it. (actually read up) Dealers: ASK your customer, you have a duty off care, if you sell and advanced wing to a new pilot just to make a few hundred quid then you need to take a time looking in the mirror asking yourself if the risk of someones life was worth it. Manufacturers: Stop selling directly, stop making such nasty wings and selling them to people with little to no airtime and then washing your hands. SW
    5 points


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